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WBAI 



AUGUST 



WBAI Goes to Bermuda 

— at prices even a subscriber can afford — 

Steve Post and Frank Millspaugh are taking off Labor Day week from their arduous duties to cruise to Bermuda aboard 
the Holland-America Line's S.S. Ryndam. They are extending an invitation to you to join them. 

The Ryndam leaves New York on Saturday, August 30th, at noon, and arrives in Bermuda on Monday, September 1st, 
at 11 a.m. Passengers will spend 2V-2 days in Bermuda using the ship as their hotel, and will leave the island for the return 
trip to New York on Wednesday, September 3rd. at 2 p.m. The Ryndam will arrive in New York at 1 p.m. on Friday, 
September 5th. 

In case you were unaware of the virtues of Bermuda, it's Britain's oldest self-governing colony, located on the Gulf Stream, 
built on and of pink coral, blooming, beach-laden and full of duty-free French and British merchandise. It's a very nice 
place, as a matter of fact. 

Prices for the cruise range from $160 to $230 per person. This amount includes your cabin, meals (the Ryndam features 
both European and Indonesian cusine), an outdoor swimming pool, a theatre, lounges, bars, a library — and special 
dances and other privileges for WBAI's own guests , plus tipping for the entire week. 

The S.S. Ryndam, registered in the innocuous Netherlands, meets international safety standards for new ships developed 
in 1948 and meets the 1966 fire safety requirements. It is air-conditioned throughout and stabilizer-equipped. It is also, 
in our official and considered opinion, a very groovyship. 




If you're interested but undecided, call 265-6088 for more information. Otherwise use the coupon below. 



Make checks payable and mail to: 
WBAI-BERMUDA CRUISE 
54 West 56th Street 
New York, N.Y. 10019 

Print Name 

AHHrp«« 

City, .*^tate, Zip 


FnflnspH i« my Hppneit of $ fSf.Sd ppr person is 
rprjiiirpHt for rpsprvatinn 1 s) 

PER PERSON RATES 
Please reserve for me (circle rate) 
DESCRIPTION DECK PER PERSON 
Inside — lower & upper berth B *$160 
Inside — lower & upper berth A and MAIN *S175 
Inside— 2 lower beds A, B and MAIN $185 
Oufs/rfe— lower & upper bed A, B and MAIN *S195 
Outside— 2 lower beds A, B and MAIN $230 

All of these cabins are without private facilities. Cabins with 
facilities are available at $275 to $360 per person. Call 265-6088 
for details. 

•These cabins are available as singles with a supplement of 
$75. Please check here ( ) if you wish a private single cabin. 

IMPORTANT: Many cabins have space for 3rd or 4th persons 
at the minimum rate of $160 per person. 




Name(s) of person (s) accompanying you: 




All rates listed include a $10 contribution to WBAI which 
is tax-deductible. 







August HighUghts 



General Manager 

FRANK MILLSPAUGH 

Aesiatant Manapera 

DALE MINOR 

LARRY JOSEPHSON 

Drama and Literature Director 

BAIRD SEARLES 

Music Director 

ERIC SALZMAN 
News Producer 

PAUL FISCHER 

Newa Producer 

BILL SCHECHNER 

Washington Bureau 

BOB KUTTNER 

Chief Announcer 

STEVE POST 

Production Director 

FRANK COFFEE 

Special Projects 

ED WOODARD 

Chief Engineer 

TOM WHITMORE 

Recording Engineers 

DAVID RAPKIK 

PETER ZANGER 

Comptroller 

BRAHNA ALBERT 

Office Manager 

KATHY DOBKIN 

Folio Editor 

ROSE MARY ANDERSON 

Promotion Director 

MOLLY McDEVin 

Subscription Regiatrars 
RISE ALBERT 
FRANK BAEZ 

The WBAI Folio Is not sold, It is sent free to each 
subscriber to the station. The program listings are 
published every month as a service to subscribers 
who support our nonprofit, noncommercial sta- 
tion at the annual rate of $15.00 (student and 
retired persons subscription rate: $10.00 a year). 
All donations are tax deductible and checks should 
be made payable to "Paclflca Foundation — WBAI." 
WBAI is on the air from 7:00 a.m. to 3:30 a.m., 
Monday to Friday, and 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 a.m., 
Saturday and Sunday. Our transmitter is located 
In the Empire State Building and we broadcast 
with an Effective Radiated Power of 5.4 KW (hori- 
zontal) and 3.85 KW (vertical). Power equivalent 
to 50,000 watts at 500 feet. Antenna: 1223 feet 
above average terrain. Height above sea level: 
1515 feet. The studio Is located at 30 East 39th 
Street, New York, N.Y. 10016. 
The offices are located at 359 East 62nd Street, 
New York, N. Y. 10021. Phone: 826-0880. Area 
code for both phones: 212. 
WBAI Is owned and operated by the Paclflca Foun- 
dation, a nonprofit institution. The other Paclflca 
stations area KPFA, Berkeley, California 94704. 
and KPFK. Los Angeles, California 90038. Sub- 
criptions are transferable. 

The duration of programs scheduled Is approxi- 
mate. The dates after listings Indicate past or 
future broadcast. The program listings are copy- 
righted (Copyright 1969, WBAI) and are not to 
be reprinted without written permission. Extracts 
may be reprinted for highlight listings. 
WBAI Is not responsible for the return or safety 
of unsolicited tapes or manuscripts. 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

READINGS FROM THE CONGRESSIONAL RECORD 

August 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 
MILITARY MONITOR 

August 4, 18 
CAVEAT EMPTOR 

August 6, 20 
CONFERENCE ON MARIHUANA 

August 6 
"THE INNER WORLD" 

August 11 
A LOOK AT LABOR AND THE LAW 

August 13 
ARTISTS AGAINST THE EXPRESSWAY 

August 20 
ANTI-BALLISTIC MISSILE RALLY 

August 26 



DRAMA AND LITERATURE 

THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: THE STAR-PIT 

August 2 
ALICE IN WONDERLAND 

August 5, 12, 15, 19, 26 
THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: FEDERICO 

August 7 
THE MAIDS 

August 9 
AN EVENING OF FRENCH SURREALIST POETRY IN TRANSLATION 

August 11 
THE 99.5 RADIO THEATRE: DREAMS OF MORNING AFTER GLORY 

August 12 
THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: A MAN IS MANY VOICES 

August 16 
THE 99.5 RADIO THEATRE: "MOTHER" 

August 17 
THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: TITUS GROAN 

August 31 



MUSIC 

A CONVERSATION WITH GIOGIO GOMELSKY 

August 4 
STOCKHAUSEN'S PROZESSION 

August 5 
JAZZ, ETC. 

August 6, 27 
MUSIC OF LUCIANO BERIO 

August 10, 17 
1968 SALZBURG EASTER FESTIVAL: A GERMAN REQUIEM 

August 24 
HPSCHD 

August 25 
ENDRES QUARTET 

August 30 



Folio Notes 



AUGUST 1969 



VOLUME 10, NUMBER 8 



AUGUST GOALS 

Our financial goal for August Is $26,000, including 700 new 
subscriptions, and 812 renewals which come due this month. If 
it is time for you to renew, you should be receiving a notice 
from us within a short time. If you're not sure and want to know 
if this is your renewal month, the process is simple: look at the 
address label on your July Folio (it should have arrived by this 
time). If the word "ELAPSING" or "ELAPSED" appears there, 
that's your cue to renew. There is a renewal label on page 23 of 
this Folio. Fill it out completely, and put it, together with your 
check for the appropriate amount of money, in an envelope, 
and send it all to us at our new address: 359 East 62nd Street, 
New York, New York 10021. 

If you like to keep up with our daily financial progress (or 
regress), this information is broadcast nightly just before the 
6:30 News. A weekly run-down of how the station is doing can 
be heard on Report to the Listener each Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. 
(rebroadcast Wednesdays at 9:00 a.m.). 

THE COVER 

The August Folio cover is a photograph by Ben Fernandez of a 
work by Anthony Krauss. Mr. Krauss was born in New York City, 
where he now resides. He has received numerous awards and grants, 
among them the Emily Lowe Painting Competition Award, a 
fellowship from the Mac Dowell Colony, and a grant from the 
Walter K. Gutman Foundation. Mr. Krauss' works have 
appeared in exhibitions all over the country, and he js well rep- 
resented in many museums and private collections. 

A WBAI supporter of long-standing, Mr. Krauss has donated 
his work for us to sell at past WBAI art exhibitions, and we wish 
to take this opportunity to thank him for his support and 
generosity. 

AUGUST PROGRAMMING 

Unfortunately, there just wasn't enough time in July to com- 
pletely reschedule all the programs that were pre-empted by our 
May-June Marathon. August's Folio finishes the job (we hope). 
We apologize to those of you who have been kept waiting. 

August is festival month for the Drama and Literature Depart- 
ment. Some of the finest productions of the Mind's Eye Theatre 
and the 99.5 Radio Theatre will be presented in a special 
retrospective series. Included in this series will be such popular 
offerings as The Star Pit by Samuel R. Delany; NEW YORK. 
New York, new york. a montage of readings about New York; 
A Child Went Forth, an original off-Broadway production by 
David Sawn; and readings from Mervyn Peake's contemporary 
Gothic trilogy, Titus Groan. 

Some D&L Marathon pre-emptions, rescheduled in August, are 
the Mind's Eye Theatre's Federico, a unique biographical pot- 
pourri about the Spanish poet, Federico Garcia Lorca; Frank 
Coffee's reading of Alexander Solzhenitzyn's short story. The 
Right Hand: An Evening of French Surrealist Poetry: and a 
reading by young poet and college student, Diana Wald. 

We are also rebroadcasting the complete series of talks by 
the Indian philosopher J. Krishnamurti in their correct order, due 
to overwhelming listener demand. 

Picking up where Larry Josephson leaves off (we're sorry. 
Larry), the Music Department reports that "August Schnabel will 
play the Beethoven piano sonatas this month, and the Saturday 
and Sunday morning concerts are also of an august nature: 
great performances dubbed off old 78's for the BAl Archives. 
Other performances include Maderna conducting Le Marteait 
Sans Maitre. Strauss' Daphne, conducted by Bohme (its original 
conductor); Von Karajan and Fischer-Dieskau in Brahms' 
Requiem: Handel's Deborah: Mussorgsky's Boris Godounov. 
and a grand performance of Stockhausen's Prozession. 

"After Schnabel, a week from the High Renaissance and 
then Bach Cantatas for a week (august August). The Nonesuch 



Explorer series sends music lilting through the air from the 
East and South (auspicious, if not august)." 

A Conversation with Giogio Gomelsky and Neal Conan; Lu- 
ciano Berio I and II. two programs from the Assoc, of German 
Broadcasters: the Endres Quartet and the Southwest German 
Quintet, and other programs, will round out the month, mu- 
sically-speaking. 

HOUSTON DAY 

As you may already know, the Pacifica Foundation has acquired 
another station, this one in Houston, Texas. Things are just 
getting underway there but in order to become functional, they 
need money (as do we all). WBAI has put aside two days of its 
broadcasting time to air some programs that have been made by 
the Houston station and to ask our listeners to send financial 
support to the new Pacifica station. Houston programming, 
therefore, will take over WBAI's air at 7:00 p.m. on August 19, 
and will continue through midnight of the 20th. Writes Larry 
Lee, who is organizing the Houston project: 

"Those of us who work for Pacifica in Texas, trying to start 
a free station in a place that looks unlikely, do the work because 
we think the addition of a single, if small, window on the 
world, may have a catalytic effect upon the efforts of disparate 
groups which sense the need for change, in the biggest city in 
the South but who have failed rather thoroughly to date in 
discovering ways of rrvaking change happen. Houston is some- 
thing of a Los Angeles of a place, fractionalized and constructed 
in such a way that a well-to-do WASP can get to his skyscraper 
office without a glimpse of a crescent of appalling poverty which 
lies in the undeveloped northeastern wards. 

"The Texas legislature has been most clever in maintaining 
the methods of voter segregation past the date of the federal 
courts' clampdown on the poll tax. Councilmen and school trustees 
are elected by an at-large system which denies the blacks any 
voice in the city's government. The city administration's response 
to black efforts to organize is a sophisticated program of under- 
cover opinion sampling conducted by a Rice University anthro- 
pologist [whose] weekly reports on hotspots and hot people 
allow the mayor to move selectively with cosmetic self-help 
programs and, in some cases, to destroy black leadership which 
frightens them. 

"But despite this dismaying evidence of media collusion and 
cover-up, Houston is a city. This means that, to live and to 
grow to what it is today, it contains a good many people who 
think they have a right to make up their own minds about things. 

"These people, as many of them as we can reach, are the heart 
of the Pacifica effort in Houston. 

"Today, Pacifica-Houston has about $25,000 in firm support, 
the chance at a $26,000 federal grant, a deserted old warehouse 
basement of a station site, and the aid of some 500 development 
and production volunteers. There isn't nearly enough money yet 
to build the Pacifica station in Houston, but the Foundation is 
firm in its intention to take its idea beyond the megacities which 
can sustain the stations as fascinating luxuries to a vast, yet 
smaller, one where Pacifica is a long-deferred necessity. 

"The Pacifica people in Houston are young and smart and 
hungry to hear things and to say them. On your Pacifica station 
this month, you will hear what the Houston station's constit- 
uency as yet cannot: programs in which the city's problems are 
illuminated, its arts celebrated, its hopes and possibilities explored. 

"Perhaps it will make you mindful of your luck in being part 
of Pacifica where this kind of broadcasting is alive and well 
and, perhaps, taken for granted. Perhaps ... it will make you 
willing to help Pacifica extend its idea to a place which needs 
its best natives, but a place which has achieved such efficient 
ways of stomping their dreams that the best people leave or 
fall silent." 

(Make your tax-deductible checks out to: "Pacifica-Houston" 
and mail them to: Pacifica-Houston, 1200 Bissonnet, Houston, 
Texas 77005). 



WBAI 



Page 5 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 1 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry bombs 
out for the beach, leaving the lis- 
teners in charge of the morning. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer. 
(July 31) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Young Ameri- 
cans for Freedom. (July 31) 

9:30 DARIUS MILHAUD Performed by 
Radio Luxembourg's soloists and or- 
chestra under the composer's direc- 
tion. Six Little Symphonies, L'Homme 
et son Desire. (Candide CE 31008) 
(July 31) 

10:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Events to attend in the New York 
metropolitan area. (July 31) 

10:45 OF UNICORNS AND UNI- 
VERSES Baird Searles' weekly sur- 
vey of science fiction. (July 31) 

11:00 COMMENTARY by Students for 
a Democratic Society. (July 31) 

11:15 MIDDLE EAST PRESS REVIEW 
Reviews of Arab and Israeli press 
from the BFA. (July 31) 

11:45 MISCELLANY 

12:00 THREE SHORT BACH CANTA- 
TAS Der Friede sei mit dir; War Mich 
Liebet, der wird mein Wort halten; 
O Jesu Christ, mein's Lebens Licht 
with soloists, the Amsterdamer Kan- 
torei, and the Concerto Amsterdam 
under Jaap Schroeder. (Telefunken 
SWAT 9489-B) (July 29) 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #1 A reading in 
16 parts of Fannie Kelly's account 
of her capture as a 19-year-old girl 
by a band of Ogalalla Sioux near 
Fort Laramie in 1864. The book is an 
outstanding early- example of the dis- 
crepant attitudes of the American 
frontier spirit toward the Indians: 
that they were, on the one hand "red 
savages," and on the other, hapless 
victims of a necessary transforma- 
tion of society. Ann Rivers is the 
reader. (From WBAI Archives) 

1:00 A BELL RINGING IN THE EMP- 
TY SKY Japanese Shakugachi music 
performed by Goro Yamaguchi on 
a Nonesuch Explorer series record. 
(July 31) 

1:30 A DEPLETION ALLOWANCE FOR 
PEOPLE? Noted civil liberties attor- 
ney Francis Heisler talks with Elsa 
Knight Thompson and Lincoln Berg- 
man about the federal suit he and 
his wife, Friedy, have brought for a 
refund of income taxes on the oasis 
of a 27Cf personal depletion allow- 
ance. From KPFA. (July 30) 

2:00 THE QUALITY AND DIRECTION 
OF AMERICAN LIFE The failures 
of our society, and the probability 
of rectifying them, are discussed by 
Richard Goodwin, author and former 
presidential advisor. (From the Mid- 
way 1270) 

3:00 CREATIVE NON-VIOLENCE Cae- 
sar Chavez, the non-violent leader, 
talks with members of the Center 



for the Study of Democrtic Institu- 
tions about the labor conflict between 
growers and grape workers. (From 
the Center #457) (July 26) 

3:30 POPULAR MUSIC OF AFRICA Su- 
gar Soup; Down the Congo; Satur- 
day Night; Drum Festival; Cocomba; 
Beyond Africa; Congo Beat; Echoes 
of the African Forest; Bus Conduc- 
tor; Ebony; Kenya Sunset; Awuben; 
Akudonno. Not "ethnic" music at all 
but contemporary African pop per- 
formed by Saka Acquaye and his Afri- 
can Ensemble from Ghana. (None- 
such Explorer) (July 31) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEO- 
PLE Let's begin August with a preep 
— Preep the Pigeon of Trafalgar 
Square, to be exact. The story is by 
Max Schulman and is published by 
Random House. The reader is Miriam 
Almeleh, accompanied by the occa- 
sional voices of her children. 

5:00 MA VLAST by BEDRICH SME- 
TANA. Six symphonic poems per- 
formed by the Symphony Orchestra 
of RAI, Turin, and conducted by Pe- 
ter Maag. (Aug. 4) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY The 
week's news in review by the WBAI 
Washington Bureau staff. (Aug. 2) 

7:30 DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP Betty 
Pilkington turns her mike on the UN 
diplomats and their actions of the 
past week. (Aug. 2) 

8:00 A SATIRICAL VIEW By Marshall 
Efron, assisted by Dryden and Swift. 
(Aug. 2) 

8:15 FREAKS, CARNIVALS AND CON 
MEN Charles Hayden from the Ar- 
chives. (AS 1027) (Aug. 2) 

8:45 EXPLORER: GOLDEN RAIN Ba- 
linese Gamelan Music and the Rama- 
yana Monkey Chant. (Nonesuch H- 
72028) (Aug. 2) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
program of timely interest from the 
News and Public Affairs Department. 



Index of Commentaries 

AFRICA SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 

August 3, 17; 7:30 p.m. 
BLACK PANTHER PARTY 

■August 8, 22; 8:30 p.m. 
BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS 

August 10, 24; 7:30 p.m. 
COMMENTARY OF JEWISH AFFAIRS 

Wednesdays; 7:00 p.m. 
DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP 

Fridays; 7:30 p.m. 
MARSHALL EFRON 

Fridays; 8:00 p.m. 
NEIL FABRICANT 

Sundays; 7:15 p.m. 
SAM JULTY 

Saturdays; 6:45 p.m. 
CONRAD LYNN 

Mondays; 7:00 p.m. 
WILLIAM MANDEL 

Saturdays; 7:15 p.m. 
METROPOLITAN COUNCIL ON HOUSING 

Mondays; 7:15 p.m. 
MIDDLE EAST PRESS REVIEW 

Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. 
MONTH IN REVIEW 

August 27; 8:00 p.m. 
VICTOR PERLO 

Tuesdays; 7:30 p.m. 
READINGS FROM THE 
CONGRE'^SIONAL RECORD 

Sundays; 6:45 p.m. 
REPORT ON POLITICAL PRISONERS 

Wednesdays; 7:15 p.m. 
STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC 
SOCIETY 

Thursdays; 7:15 p.m. 
YOUNG AMERICANS FOR FREEDOM 

Thursdays; 7:00 p.m. 



■(Aug.4) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fis- 
cher. (Aug. 2) 

11.00 FREE MUSIC STORE from the 
New York Shakespeare Festival, en- 
gineered by Mike Edl and/or John 
Ackley. (Aug. 4) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE How 
quietly breathes the Bob into his mi- 
crophone. 



The Board 


of 


Directors 


of the Pacifica 


Foundation 


(The names of local members are followed by an | 


asterisk *; all other names 


are those of national 


members.) 






R. Gordon Agnew 




Rudy Hurwich, President 


(KPFA) 




(KPFA) 


Joseph Cadden 




Ronald M. Loeb 


(WBAI) 




(KPFK) 


Stuart Cooney 




Lawrence D. Pinkham * 


(KPFA) 




(WBAI) 


Henry M. Elson 






(KPFA) 




Albert Ruben 


Marie Fielder 




(WBAI) 


(KPFA) 




Lloyd M. Smith 


Stephen M. Fischer 




(KPFK) 


(WBAI) 




Ron T. Smith 


Carolyn Goodman 




(KPFK) 


(WBAI) 

Meivin Greenberg * 




Harold Taylor 


(WBAI) 




(WBAI) 


Hallock Hoffman, Chairman 


Frank S. Wyle 


(KPFK) 




(KPFK) 



Page 6 



WBAI 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 2 



8:00 GREAT PERFORMANCES OF 
THE CENTURY BRAHMS Sonata 
No. 1 in G Major for Violin and 
Piano, Op. 78; Trio in E Flat Major 
for Piano, Violin and French Horn, 
Op. 40 Rudolf Serkin, piano; Adolf 
Busch, violin; Aubrey Brain, French 
horn. MOZART Symphony No. 39 in 
E Flat Major, K 543 Royal Philhar- 
monic Orchestra/Felix Weingartner. 

9:30 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEO- 
PLE Ronny Watkins with Saturday 
story and song. 

10:30 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 1) 

10:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW by Marshall 
Efron. (Aug. 1) 

11:00 FREAKS, CARNIVALS AND CON 
MEN (AS 1027) (Aug. 1) 

11:30 COUNTRY MUSIC Just that for 
all the folks down home. (July 27) 

12:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY 

From the Washington Bureau. (Aug. 
1) 



12:30 DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP With 

Betty Pilkington. (Aug. 1) 
1:00 EXPLORER: GOLDEN RAIN 

Balinese Gamelan Music and the 
Ramayana Monkey Chant. (Nonesuch 
H-72028) (Aug. 1) 

1:45 MISCELLANY 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF JAZZ All that 
jazz with Jack McKinney. 

4:00 WITCH'S BLOOD The sixth 
chapter in a serialized reading of the 
book by William Blain. The reader is 
Fredi Dundee. 

4:30 J. KRISHNAMURTI The first in 
a series of talks by the Eastern philo- 
sopher. (KPFA) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS By 
Sam Julty, who will give you a ride 
in his if you don't own one of your 
own. (Aug. 3) 

7:15 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODI- 
CALS Reviewed by William Mandel 
of the Sociology Dept., University of 
California at Berkeley. (KPFA) (Aug. 
3) 

7:30 THE $24 REFUND A program 
devoted (with deep devotion) to the 
problems of living in NYC. (Aug. 3) 



7:45 WINDS The Wind Quintet of 
Southwest German Radio in a concert 
which includes: W. FORTNER Five 
Bagatelles J. BAUR Quintetto sereno 
A. SCHOENBERG Wind Quintet and 
P. HINDEMITH Chamber Music in 
Miniature. Tapes courtesy Association 
of German Broadcasters. (Aug. 3) 

9:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
THE STAR-PIT by Samuel R. Delany. 
Adapted by the author exclusively for 
this production. Delany also narrates, 
and other voices heard are those of 
Randa Haines, Walter Harris, Jerry 
Matz, Joan Tanner, and Phoebe Wray. 
Music specially composed and played 
by Susan Schweers; direction by 
Daniel Landau; technical production 
by David Rapkin and Neal Conan. 

11:15 WHERE HAVE ALL THE 
CUCKOOS GONE? Aldous Huxley 
(now deceased) leads a discussion of 
the ecological effects of technology — 
a lament that the loss of the birds and 
the bees may be the price we are 
paying for our conquest of nature. 
(From the Center No. 7A.) (Aug. 7) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Guess what, 
Aldous? We found the cuckoos! 
They're nesting in Steve Post's hair. 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 3 



8:00 GREAT PERFORMANCES OF 
THE CENTURY PURCELL Dido and 
Aeneas Joan Hammond, Dido; Isobel 
Baillie, Belinda; Edith Coates, 
Sorceress; Denis Nobel, Aeneas; S. 
Patriss, Spirit; J. Fullerton, 2nd 
woman; E. Hobson, Gladys Ripley, 
two witches; T. Jones, Sailor; Boris 
Ord, continue; Chorus and Phil- 
harmonia String Orchestra/Constant 
Lambert BEETHOVEN Trio No. 7 
in B Flat Major, Op. 97. Solomon, 
piano; Anthony Pini, cello; Henry 
Hoist, violin. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES Ethnic music presented by the 
late Dr. Henry Cowell. From the 
WBAI Archives. 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES The late 
Anthony Boucher with his famous 
collection of recordings by the fa- 
bulous stars of the opera stage 'if 
yesteryear. (KPFA) 

10:30 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS By 
Sam Julty. (Aug. 2) 

11:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODI- 
CALS Reviewed by William Mandel. 
(KPFA) (Aug. 2) 

11:15 GERMANY TODAY Presented by 
David Berger, from the Association 
of German Broadcasters. 

11:30 THE $24 REFUND About Olde 
Newe Yorke. (Aug. 2) 

11:45 WINDS Those instruments in 
quintets. Details of the concert in the 
August 2 listing. 

1:00 BUCKMINSTER FULLER: Out- 
stairs and Instairs The first in a 
four-part series based on a lecture 
given by the noted architect and philo- 
sopher at Berkeley Community 
Theater in the spring, 1969. Fuller 
uncovers, in this first portion of his 



talk, some current misconceptions 
about nature and infinity. (KPFA) 

1:45 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT: The 
.-Vrchitect in Perspective The first in 
a series of 6 programs commemorat- 
ing the centenary of the patriarch of 
modern architecture. In this program 
Bruce Raddo examines Wright's early 
career, methods of working, and philo- 
sophy of architecture. (KPFA). 

2:45 LITERATURE, LATIN AMER- 
ICA: The Early Poetry of Pablo 
Neruda This is the first in a series 
of programs of Latin American lite- 
rature. Here we have the early works 
and life of the Chilean poet Pablo 
Neruda. The program was written 
and produced Iby Carlos Hagen and 
narrated by David Ossman. (KPFA) 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY Bob's night- 
time guests become your daytime en- 
tertainment. 

5:00 LE MARTEAU SANS MAITRE 
By PIERRE BOULEZ after a text by 
Rene Char. This performance is con- 
ducted by Bruno Maderna and in- 
cludes: Carla Menuis, contralto; 
Severino Gazzelloni, flute; Kino 
Asciolla, viola; Alvaro Company, 
guitar; Leonida Torrebruno, xilo- 
marimba; Antonio Striano, vibraphon; 
and Gilberto Cuppini, percussion. Tape 
courtesy of RAI. 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC That mountain 
sound for your urbans ears. (Aug. 9) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 READINGS FROM THE CON- 
GRESSIONAL RECORD The words, 
the immortal words, of your senators 
and congressmen as recorded in that 
document. From the Washington 
Bureau. (Aug. 4) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW, OR 
BURN Milton Hoffman, TV critic for 
The Critical People, reviews The 
Golden Web by Eric Barnouw. (Ox- 



ford University Press) (Aug. 4) 

7:15 COMMENTARY By Neil Fa- 
bricant, Legislative Director of the 
New York ACLU. (Aug. 4) 

7:30 AFRICA SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 
Produced by Artur Vilankulu, a pro- 
gram on the Dark Continent. (Aug. 4) 

8:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE A look 
at artistic events of the past week 
by critics who are themselves involved 
in their particular arts. This week's 
roster includes: Ron Nelson for 
theatre, Al Lees for film, Martin Last 
for art and architecture, and Baird 
Searles (also moderating) for dance. 
(Aug. 4) 

8:45 JOSQUIN The University of 
Illinois Chamber Choir conducted by 
George Hunter sings JOSQUIN'S 
Missa Ave Maria Stella and four 
motets: Tu solus, qui facis mirabilis; 
Mittit ad virginemen; Absalon fill mi; 
and Salve regina. (Nonesuch H-71216) 
(Aug. 8) 

9:30 THEATRE NEW YORK The world 
of off-off Broadway brought to your 
home by the miracle of radio (with 
a little assistance from Ann Rivers 
and the members of the theatrical 
scene). (Aug. 6) 

10:30 MUSICA VIVA LATIN A Salz- 
man South of the Border. (Aug. 4) 

11:00 NEW AMERICAN REVIEW 
Readings of or discussions about 
selections from the relatively new lit 
mag. (Aug. 4) 

11:30 AN UNEXPURGATED HIS- 
TORY OF NEW YORK CITY A close 
look at the lineage of Alexander 
Hamilton. Viola Scott Thomas, his- 
torian of the Borough of Manhattan, 
and Herb Lambright of Inter-Global 
News Service do the examining. 
Produced by Kay Lindsey. (Aug. 5) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Steve has been 
locked in the studio since last night 
and uses this opportunity to escape. 



WBAI 



Page 7 



MONDAY, AUGUST 4 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING New York's 
Summer Festival bright-and-early 
brings you the sun ■ — well, Josephson 
is someone's son. 

9:00 COMMENTARY By Neil Fa- 
bricant. (Aug. 3) 

9:15 READINGS FROM THE CON- 
GRESSIONAL RECORD (Aug. 3) 

9:30 MA VLAST by BEDRICH 
SMETANA. Six symphonic poems 
performed by the Symphony Orchestra 
of RAI, Turin, and conducted by 
Peter Maag. (Aug. 1) 

10:45 MISCELLANY 

11:00 AFRICA SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 
Produced by Artur Vilankulu. (Aug. 
3) 

11:30 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE They 
review the events for the past week. 
(Aug. 3) 

12:15 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN Milton Hoffman reviews The 
Golden Web. (Aug. 3) 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS No. 2 Ann Rivers 
reads from Fannie Kelly's account of 
her captivity, which took place in 
1864. 

1:00 FREE MUSIC STORE From the 
New York Shakespeare Festival. 
(Aug. 1) 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL 



Special events from that department. 
(Aug. 1) 

3:00 MUSICA VIVA LATIN A Salzman 
South of the Border. (Aug. 3) 

3:30 NEW AMERICAN REVIEW From 
last night. (Aug. 3) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Richard Schiffman, guests, and "The 
real story." Talk-back follows on 
OX 7-8506. 

5:00 THE PIANO SONATAS OF 
BEETHOVEN No. 1 Performed by 
Artur Schnabel. This series was pre- 
empted by the Marathon and is being 
re-scheduled in its entirety. Sonata 
No. 1 in F Minor, Op. 2, No. 1 ; Sonata 
No. 2 in A Major, Op. 2, No. 2; Sonata 
No. 3 in C Major, Op. 2, No. 3. (RCA 
Victor LM 9500 1-3) (Aug. 5) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY By Conrad Lynn, 
noted civil liberties attorney. (Aug. 
5) 

7:15 RENT AND HOUSING IN THE 
CITY: It's a Nice Place to Visit 
But . . . News and commentary on the 
problems of living quarters in NYC. 
Produced by the Metropolitan Coun- 
cil on Housing. (Aug. 5) 

7:30 DANCE NEW YORK Marian 
Horosko's weekly report of events in 
the world of dance. (Aug. 5) 

8:00 MILITARY MONITOR A bi-weekly 
look at the smoke exuding from the 
Pentagon. Peering through the 



smokescreen is the Washington 
Bureau, assisted by the Institute for 
Policy Studies and an assortment of 
critics of the military. (Aug. 5) 

8:30 A CONVERSATION WITH 
GIOGIO GOMELSKY Mr. G is an im- 
portant person in the music business 
in England, curiously more interested 
in music than in business. In his 
Crawdaddy Club both the Rolling 
Stones and Yardbirds got their start; 
he also promoted festivals of Amer- 
ican blues for mass audiences. Mr. 
Gomelsky talks with Neal Conan about 
music, with particular attention given 
to Sonny Boy Williamson. (Aug. 5) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL 
Newsworthy events given the BAI 
treatment by the News and Public 
Affairs Department. (Aug. 5) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 5) 

11:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM: A Pro- 
gram From and For the Homosexual 
Community An interview or panel dis- 
cussion bearing on the many aspects 
of homosexual life from a subjective 
viewpoint. Possible also, pertinent 
readings or documentaries. The pro- 
gram begins with news and reviews. 
(Aug. 5) 

11:30 THE FOURTH ESTATE Black 
affairs in review. (Aug. 5) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob 
Fass does the unnameable: broadcast- 
ing live. 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 5 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING How doth 
the little busy bee the happy hours . . . 
what's the rest of that one? Maybe 
Larry remembers. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer 
(Aug. 4) 

9:15 COMMENTARY By Conrad Lynn 
(Aug. 4) 

9:30 THE PIANO SONATAS OF 
BEETHOVEN No. 1 Concert details 
with the August 4 listing. 

10:45 RENT AND HOUSING IN THE 
CITY: It's a Nice Place to Visit 
But . . . Produced by the Metropolitan 
Council on Housing. (Aug. 4) 

11:00 MILITARY MONITOR Re: the 
Pentagon. (Aug. 4) 

11:30 AN UNEXPURGATED HISTORY 
OF NEW YORK CITY By Viola Scott 
Thomas and Herb Lambright. Pro- 
duced by Kay Lindsey. (Aug. 3) 

12:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM: A Pro- 
gram From and For the Homosexual 
Community A subjective view of the 
homosexual world. (Aug. 4) 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS No. 3 Ann Rivers 
reads from Fannie Kelley's account 
of just that. From the WBAI archives. 

1:00 A CONVERSATION WITH GIOGIO 



GOMELSKY Neal Conan interviews 
this man from the music business. 
(Aug. 4) 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL 
From that department. (Aug. 4) 

3:00 DANCE NEW YORK By Marian 
Horosko. (Aug. 4) 

3:30 THE FOURTH ESTATE A panel 
on black affairs. (Aug. 4) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Madeleine Friedman begins Lewis 
Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. 

5:00 THE PIANO SONATAS OF 
BEETHOVEN No. 2 Performed by 
Arthur Schnabel. Sonata No. 4 in E 
Flat Major, Op. 7; Sonata No. 5 in 
C Minor, Op. 10, No. 1; Sonata No. 7 
in D Major, Op. 10, No. 3. (RCA Vic- 
tor LM 9500-4-6) (Aug. 6) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 REPORT TO THE LISTENER 
Frank Millspaugh details all the old 
coats in the station's closet. (Aug. 6) 

7:15 MISCELLANY 

T^O COMMENTARY By Victor Perlo, 
economist and author. (Aug. 6) 

7:45 A WORKING MANS POETRY 
Earl Trusty, a window-washer and a 
socialist, reads his unique poetry on 
his disenchantment with the capitalist 
system. With music accompaniment. 
(Aug. 11) 

8:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 



NORA DRAKE? Mary Jane Higby, 
who essayed the title role of the soap 
opera for years, talks about her book 
about radio. Tune in Tomorrow, with 
Richard Lamparski, who would rather 
discuss his book Whatever Become 
of? . . . Second Series. (Aug. 6) 

8:,30 THE MOVIES Bob Sitton talks 
with someone in them about them. 
(Aug. 6) 

9:00 CONFRONTATION: WASHIN- 
TON The brave Washington Bureau 
confronts the Supreme Court clerks. 
(Aug. 6) 

9:30 ARTS EXTRA Something extra 
special from the Drama and Litera- 
ture Department. (Aug. 6) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 6) 

11:00 PROZESSION FOR TAMTAM, 
VIOLA, ELEKTRONIUM, PIANO, 
FILTERS AND POTENTIOMETERS 
A recording of a live performance by 
Alfred Alings and Rolf Gehlhaar, 
tamtams; Johannes G. Fritsch, viola; 
Harald Boje, elektronum; Aloys 
Kontarsky, piano; and Karlheinz 
Stockhausen, filters and potentio- 
meters. (Candide, CE 31001). (Aug. 
6) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE The 
magic of midnight with Bob, the 
Wizard. 



Page 8 



WBAI 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Was the 

Word, and the Word was made . . . 

Larry. 
9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 

(Aug. 5) 
9:15 REPORT TO THE LISTENER By 

Frank Millspaugh. (Aug. 5) 
9:30 THE PIANO SONATAS OF 

BEETHOVEN No. 2 Concert details 

under the August 5 listing. 
10:45 COMMENTARY By Victor Perlo, 

economist and author. (Aug. 5) 
11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 

NORA DRAKE? Richard Lamparski 

asks Mary Jane Higby about that. 

(Aug. 5) 
11:30 THE MOVIES By Bob Sitton. 

(Aug. 5) 
12:00 CONFRONTATION: WASHING- 
TON The Supreme Court clerks meet 

the Washington Bureau in a title bout. 

(Aug. 5) 
12:30 MY CAPITIVITY AMONG THE 

SIOUX INDIANS No. 4 Ann Rivers 

reads from the account of her captivi- 



ty by Fannie Kelly. From the WBAI 
Archives. 

1:00 PROZESSION FOR TAMTAM, 
VIOLA, ELEKTRONIUM, PIANO, 
FILTERS AND POTENTIOMETERS 
These instruments and instrumental- 
ists appear in the August 5 listing. 

2:00 ARTS EXTRA From the Drama 
and Literature Department. (Aug. 5) 

3:00 THEATRE, NEW YORK (Aug. 3) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEO- 
PLE Bob Cohen, the friendly spirit, 
asks you to Sing When the Spirit 
Says Sing. 

5:00 THE PIANO SONATAS OF 
BEETHOVEN No. 3 Performed by 
Artur Schnabel. Sonata No. 6 in F 
Major, Op. 10, No. 2; Sonata No. 8 in 
C Minor, Op. 13 ("Pathetique") ; 
Sonata No. 9 in E Major, Op. 14, No. 
1; Sonata No. 11 in B Flat Major, Op. 
22. (RCA Victor 9500 5-9) (Aug. 7) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY ON JEWISH AF- 
FAIRS A discussion of a topic of in- 
terest to the Jewish community's 
members. (Aug. 7) 

7:15 REPORT ON POLITICAL PRIS- 



ONERS Presented by members of 
Amnesty International. (Aug. 7) 

7:30 CAVEAT EMPTOR From Ralph 
Nader's speech on unclean food given 
before the American Society of 
Newspeper Editors. (Aug. 7) 

8:00 CONFERENCE ON MARIJUANA 
A discussion of the medical, legal, 
and social questions pertaining to the 
use of marijuana. The speakers are 
Dr. Joel Fort, Dr. Henry Brill, Dr. 
Sidney Cohen, Harold J. Rothwax, 
Frederick M. Garfield, and Bard 
Grosse. From the session sponsored 
by Congressman Edward I. Koch. 
(Aug. 7) 

9:30 MAGAZINE 99.5 Dale Minor and/ 
or Frank Millspaugh report on recent 
events requiring in-depth investiga- 
tion. (Aug. 7) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul 
Fischer. (Aug. 7) 

1 1 :00 JAZZ, ETC. A talk with the noted 
bassist Jimmy Garrison, who is heard 
in recordings with Sonny Rollins, Or- 
nette Coleman and Elvin Jones. (Aug. 
8) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob, the 
Fass-test gun alive. 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 7 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry pulls 
all the wires out of the computer, 
which explains why this folio may be 
your last. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 6) 

9:15 COMMENTARY ON JEWISH 
AFFAIRS By a member of the Jewish 
community. (Aug. 6) 

9:30 THE PIANO SONATAS OF 
BEETHOVEN No. 3 Details of the 
concert are in the August 6 listing. 

10:45 REPORT ON POLITICAL PRIS- 
ONERS By Amnesty International. 
(Aug. 6) 

11:00 CAVEAT EMPTOR Ralph Nader 
speaks on unclean food. (Aug 6) 

11:30 MISCELLANY 

11:45 WHERE HAVE ALL THE 
CUCKOOS GONE? Aldous Huxley 
discusses our ecological dilemma (Aug. 
2) 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS No. 5 Ann Rivers 
reads from the account of her being 
taken captive by Fannie Kelly. This 
all happened in 1864. From WBAI's 
Archives. 
1:00 CONFERENCE ON MARIJUANA 
The medical, legal, and social ques- 
tion pertinent to grass. (Aug. 6) 
2:30 MAGAZINE 99.5 Frank or Dale 



discuss contemporary events of note. 
(Aug. 6) 

3:30 THE NEW BOHEMIA A 1966 pro- 
gram about EVO. (AS 1040) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEO- 
PLE Caryn and David Watkins 
present Watkins Rock. 

5:00 BERGEN FESTIVAL A piano 
recital by Claudio Arrau. BEE- 
THOVEN Sonata in C Minor, Op. Ill 
DEBUSSY Three Pieces from Images, 
Book I CHOPIN Ballade No. 3 in A 
Flat Major, Op. 47. (Aug. 8) 

6:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
If you're really bored with the com- 
munity, try some of these sugges- 
tions for entertainment. (Aug. 8) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY By members of 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Aug. 

8) 

7:15 COMMENTARY By members of 
Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Aug. 8) 

7:30 MIDDLE EAST PRESS REVIEW 
Reviews of the Arab and Israeli press, 
produced by the Broadcasting Founda- 
tion of America in cooperation with 
the Association of Arab Broadcasters 
and Kol Israel. (Aug. 8) 

8:00 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVER- 
SES A weekly review of fantasy and 
speculative fiction, not only in their 
literary aspects, but also in film, 
theatre, and the arts. Baird Searles 
reports, assisted by Neal Conan. 
(Aug. 8) 

8:15 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
FORTUNA The poems set by Carl 



Orff in his Carmina Burana are read 

in English translations by the Word 
Players, who are Larry Holpp, Dona 
Marans, Albert Merton, Judy Ratner, 
Julie Scherer, and Ed Walker. Di- 
rected by Baird Searles. Hear of the 
joys of the flesh penned by the 
Goliards, medieval defrocked church- 
men and students, interpreted in a 
modern way. (Aug. 10) 

8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN 
CULTURAL REVOLUTION Hear the 

joys of revolution sung by Julius Lester 
and various recorded vocalists. If he's 
taking calls, the number is OX 
7-8506. 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul 
Fischer. (Aug. 8) 

11:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
FEDERICO A radio entertainment 
based on the life of the Spanish poet 
Federico Garcia Lorca, written, 
produced and directed by David David- 
son Reiff. This stylized biographical 
montage contains material presented 
in English for the first time. In the 
cast are Simon Bryquer, Robert Kidd, 
Warren Finnerty, Tom Lilliard, Marty 
Brenna, Vic Arnold, Esteban Vicente, 
Taylor Meade, Bruce Ruddow, Susan 
Baumgarten, Harry Koutukis, and 
Norman Fischer. (Aug. 8) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob, too, 
presents materials never before 
heard in English ... or in any lan- 
guage for that matter. 



WBAI 



Page 9 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 8 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry 
cancels this series for the rest of 
the summer. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 7) 

9:15 COMMENTARY By Young Amer- 
icans for Freedom. (Aug. 7) 

9:30 BERGEN FESTIVAL Claudio 
Arrau in concert. Program details in 
the August 7 listing. 

10:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN 
BOARD Events of interest to attend 
in NYC. (Aug. 7) 

10:45 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVER- 
SES A review of science fiction by 
Baird Searles and Neal Conan. (Aug. 
7) 

11:00 COMMENTARY By Students for 
a Democratic Society. (Aug. 7) 

11:15 MIDDLE EAST PRESS REVIEW 
Both Arab and Israeli press in review. 
(Aug. 7) 

11:45 JOSQUIN Four of his motets and 
a mass. Details of the concert are in 
the August 3 listing. 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS No. 6 From 
WBAI's Archives. 



1:00 JAZZ, ETC. Music and talk, (Aug. 
6) 

2:00 URBANIZATION: Its Many 
Meanings A talk by Scott Greer of 
Northwestern University. Followed 
by MODEL CITIES: An Experiment 
in Participatory Democracy, a talk 
by Floyd Hyde, former Mayor of 
Fresno, Calif. (From the Midway 
1271) 

3:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
FEDERICO Based on the life of 
Federico Garcia Lorca, these ma- 
terials are read in English for the 
first time. (Aug. 7) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEO- 
PLE Today, we hear Miriam Almeleh 
reading from Isaac Bashevis Singer's 
When Shlemiel Went to Warsaw and 
Other Stories, published by Farrar, 
Straus & Giroux. 

5:00 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #4 Performed by Artur 
Schnabel. Sonata No. 10 in G Major, 
Op. 14, No. 2; Sonata No. 12 in A Flat 
Major, Op. 27, No. 1; Sonata No. 2 
("Moonlight"). RCA Victor LM 9500, 
8-9-10. (Aug. 11) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY Bob 
Kuttner of the Washington Bureau 



presents news, views, and scandal 
from the Potomac. (Aug. 9) 

7:30 DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP Betty 
Pilkington and members of the UN 
diplomatic corps. (Aug. 9) 

8:00 A SATIRICAL VIEW The week's 
news as seen through the myopic 
spectrum of Marshall Efron's vision. 
(Aug. 9) 

8:15 MISCELLANY 

8:30 COMMENTARY By members of 
the Black Panther Party. (Aug. 9) 

8:45 EXPLORER: KINGDOM OF THE 
SUN Music from the Incas of Peru 
recorded in Peru by David Lewiston. 
Includes music performed on pan- 
pipes, flutes, trumpets, drums, harp, 
and conch. (Nonesuch H-72029) (Aug. 
9) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
current event scrutinized by the News 
and Public Affairs Department. (Aug. 
11) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fis- 
cher. (Aug. 9) 

11:00 FREE MUSIC STORE From the 
New York Shakespeare Festival - 
WBAI collaborative series. (Aug. 11) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob 
wraps up the week in a big corru- 
gated carton and drops it in the East 
River. 




keKer 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 9 



8:00 GREAT PERFORMANCES OF THE 

CENTURY: WANDA LANDOWSKA 

PLAYS BACH AND HANDEL. BACH 

Goldberg Variations HANDEL Suite 

No. 10 in D; Suite No. 7 in G; Suite 

No. 14 in G. 
9:30 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 

Spend Sunday morning with Ronny 

Watkins. 
10:30 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 

(Aug. 8) 
10:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW By Marshall 

Efron. (Aug. 8) 
11:00 MISCELLANY 
11:15 COMMENTARY By members of 

the Black Panther Party. (Aug. 8) 
11:30 COUNTRY MUSIC (Aug. 3) 
12:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY The 

goings-on in Washington, D.C. (Aug. 

8) 
.12:30 DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP By 

Betty Pilkington. (Aug. 8) 
1:00 EXPLORER: KINGDOM OF THE 
SUN Music from the Incas of Peru. 
(Aug. 8) 
1:45 MISCELLANY 
2:00 TWO HOURS OF FOLK MUSIC 



Produced and presented by Israel 
Young. 

4:00 WITCH'S BLOOD the seventh 
chapter from William Bain's book 
about a witch and the town she cursed. 
Fredi Dundee is the reader. 

4:30 J. KRISHNAMURTI The second of 
this series of talks. (KPFA) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS or 
car buyers or enthusiasts, for that 
matter, by Sam Julty. (Aug. 10) 

7:00 MISCELLANY 

7:15 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
AND PERIODICALS William Mandel. 
of the Sociology Dept., University of 
California, tells it like it is in the 
USSR. (KPFA) (Aug. 10) 

7:30 THE $24 REFUND A continuing 
discussion of the small horrors of liv- 
ing in New York City, or, it's the little 
things that mount. (Aug. 10) 

7:45 MISCELLANY 

8:00 THE MAIDS Genet's famed the- 
atre of cruelty masterpiece per- 



formed in its native French by William 
Brodecky, Gerald Fabian, and Marilyn 
Hacker. Directed by Samuel Delany. 
(KPFA) (Aug. 13) 

9:30 MUSIQUE EXTRA Recent releases 
approved for broadcast by our aging 
Music Dept. (Aug. 10) 

10:00 AND THE LAST SHALL BE 
FIRST Kain, Felipe Liciano and David 
Nelson encompass the sound of black 
poetry. (Aug. 13) 

11:30 THE EARTH KILLERS Lord 
Ritchie-Calder, noted science historian, 
tells John Cogley in a conversation 
at the Center for the Study of Dem- 
ocratic Institutions that the world 
will continue "mucking things up" be- 
yond repair unless science comes un- 
der public control while time still 
remains. Fron\ the Center #466. 
(Aug. 10) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Steve Post con- 
tinues the previous program by show- 
ing exactly how the world "mucks 
things up" and he doesn't even have 
to do anything special! 



Page 10 



WBAI 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 10 



8:00 GREAT PERFORMANCES OF 
THE CENTURY: SCHUMANN Fan- 
tasia in C Major, Op 17; Nachtstuck 
in F Major, Op. 23, No. 4 Wilhelm 
Backaus; Carnaval, Op. 9 Sergei 
Rachmaninoff SCHUBERT Sonata in 
A Major, posthumous opus Artur 
Schnabel. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES The late Henry Cowell presents 
ethnic music from all over. From 
WBAI's Archives. 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES The late An- 
thony Boucher presents old recordings 
of great operatic singers. From 
KPFA's Archives. 

10:30 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS By 
Sam Julty. (Aug. 8) 

10:45 MISCELLANY 

11:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODI- 
CALS Reviewed by William Mandel. 
(KPFA) (Aug 9) 

11:15 GERMANY TODAY David Ber- 
ger with tapes from the Assoc, of 
German Broadcasters. 

11:30 THE $24 REFUND Discussion of 
the horrors of living in N.Y.C. (Au^. 
9) 

11:45 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
Fortuna. Details August 7. 

12.00 THE EARTH KILLERS Details 
August 9. 

12:30 MUSIQUE EXTRA A rebroadcast 
of last night's program. 

1:00 BUCKMINSTER FULLER: Rear- 
ranging the Scenery In this program 
Fuller discusses the history of man's 



discovery of natural resources, and 
explores the belief that more material 
possesions create more wealth. 
(KPFA) 
2:00 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT: The Im- 
perial Hotel, Triumph and Tragedy 
Wright's first great international 
triumph was the Imperial Hotel in 
Tokyo (1915-23), a building that sur- 
vived both the disastrous earthquakes 
of 1924 and the bombing raids of 
World War I, only to be torn down in 
1968 in the name of progress. (KPFA). 
3:00 LITERATURE, LATIN AMERICA: 
The Poetry of Ricanor Parra Kenneth 
Lash reads from the work of the con- 
temporary Chilean poet, Ricanor Parra. 
The tape includes some comments on 
Parra's work by Mr. Lash and others. 
(KPFA) 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY Bob Fass with a 
rehash of last week's programs. 

5:00 FLUTE CONCERT! OF 18th CEN- 
TURY PARIS From the WBAI Ar- 
chives, a program of early 18th cen- 
tury flute concerti, by the French 
composer Joseph Bodin de Boismortier 
and Michael CoiTete. (Aug. 15) 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC Music from 
the sticks. (Aug. 16) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 READINGS FROM THE CON- 
GRESSIONAL RECORD Important 
stuff, that! (Aug. 11) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN Martin Last, Art Critic for 
The Critical People, reviews several 
new books. (Aug. 11) 

7:15 COMMENTARY By Neil Fabricant, 
of the New York chapter of the Amer- 



ican Civil Liberties Union. (Aug 11) 

7:30 BOTH SIDE OF THE BARS David 
Rothenberg and others go into the 
problems and difficulties facinf; a per- 
son before, during and after imprison- 
ment. Produced by the Fortune So- 
ciety. (Aug. 11) 

8:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE What's 
happening in the various arts, dis- 
cussed and mulled over by a variety 
of people including, probably, Tom 
McKnight for art and architecture and 
Milton Hoffman for TV, with "ZVOL- 
UNTEERS," and moderated by Baird 
Searles. (Aug. 11) 

8:45 THE RIGHT HAND by Alexander 
Solzhenitsyn The author of A Day in 
the Life of Ivan Denisovich, Cancer 
Ward, and The First Circle, presents 
a new short story about the camps, 
the hospitals, the petty bureaucracy, 
and the weight of the past on present 
day Russia. This story, which is banned 
in the Soviet Union, appeared in the 
April 28th edition of The Atlantic 
Monthly. Frank Coffee of WBAI does 
the reading. (Aug. 12) 

9:30 MUSIC OF LUCIANO BERIO I 
Allez-Hop, Alleluja II for Orchestra 
(both conducted by Bruno Maderna) 
and Esposizione I. Tapes courtesy of 
RAI. (Aug. 12) 

10:30 MUSICA VIVA LATINA Salzman 

South of the border. (Aug. 11) 
11:00 DEDICATED TO THE ONES 
WE LOVE A poetic cbnversation. 
Verta Smart Grosvenor and Kay Lind- 
sey put poetry in its rightful place 
for all those who will listen. (Aug. 
12) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Why not drop in? 



MONDAY, AUGUST 1 1 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry reads 
some interesting fan mail to various 
personalities who reigned at WBAI 
in 1964. 

9:00 COMMENTARY By Neil Fabricant. 
(Aug. 10) 

9:15 READINGS FROM THE CON- 
GRESSIONAL RECORD From the 
Washington Bureau. (Aug. 10) 

9:30 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #4 Performed by Artur 
Schnabel. (Aug. 8) 

10:45 A WORKING MAN'S POETRY 
Earl Trusty reads some of his poems. 
(Aug. 5) 

11:00 BOTH SIDES OF THE BVRS 
From the Fortune Society. (Aug. 10) 

11:30 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE Re- 
views of the arts. (Aug. 10) 

12:15 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN Reviews of art books by Martin 
Last. (Aug. 10) 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #7 Ann Rivers 
reads another installment of the ac- 
count by Fannie Kelly. 

1:00 FREE MUSIC STORE From the 
New York Shakespeare Theater-WBAI 



collaborative series. (Aug 8) 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL Last 
Friday's program rebroadcast. 

3:00 MUSICA VIVA LATINA Salzman 
South of the border. (Aug 10) 

3:30 THE MARRIAGE OF HEAVEN 
AND HELL Blake read by Arnold 
Tager. (AS 2077) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
Kid Stuff News about things to do 
and books to read for young people 
and their parents. Madeleine Fried- 
man, Karen Yellin, Gene Endres and 
Fred Clarke may constitute the panel. 

5:00 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #5 Performed by Artur 
Schnabel. Continuing the series. So- 
nata No. 15 in D Major, Op. 28; Sonata 
No. 16 in C Major, Op. 31, No. 1; 
Sonata No. 17 in D Minor, Op. 31, 
No. 2 ("Tempest") (RCA Victor LM 
9500, 12-14) (Aug. 12) 

6:15 NEWS With Paul Fischer 

7:00 COMMENTARY By Conrad Lynn, 
author and civil liberties lawyer. (Aug. 
12) 

7:15 RENT AND HOUSING IN NEW 
YORK CITY: It's a Nice Place to 
Visit, But . . . Members of the Metro- 
litan Council on Housing discuss some 
aspect of this fair city. (Aug. 12) 

7:30 DANCE, NEW YORK Marian Hor- 



osko discusses, often with guests, some 
aspect of the dance. (Aug. 12) 

8:00 AN EVENING OF FRENCH SUR- 
REALIST POETRY IN TRANSLA- 
TION The poems of Baudelaire, 
Rimbaud and other French surrealist 
poets. The poems are translated and 
read by Joachim Neugroschel and 
Carter Radcliffe. This is the first in 
an irregular series of translation of 
poets around the world. (Aug. 14) 

8:45 THE INNER WORLD David Ro- 
thenberg interviews several convicts 
at the State Prison in Rahway, New 
Jersey, on their prison radio program 
called Inner World. 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL From 
that department, a program of im- 
portance. (Aug. 12) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer 
(Aug. 12) 

11:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM: A pro- 
gram From and For the Homosexual 
Community. (Aug. 12) 

11:30 JOHNNY WINTER, JOHNNY 
WINTER Songs sung by him. (Aug. 
13) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob tells 
it like it should be. 



WBAI 



Page 1 1 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 12 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING No Soap, 
telephone. Or, perhaps. No telephone, 
soap, depending on whether or not the 
Phone Co. has installed line 38 at this 
time. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 11) 

9:15 COMMENTARY By Conrad Lynn. 
(Aug. 11) 

9:30 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #5 Performed by Artur 
Schnabel. (Aug 11) 

10:45 RENT AND HOUSING IN THE 
CITY: It's a Nice Place to Visit, 
But . . . Produced by the Metropolitan 
Council on Housing. (Aug 11) 

11:00 THE RIGHT HAND by Alexander 
Solzhenitsyn His new story, read by 
Frank Coffee. Details August 10. 

11:45 MISCELLANY 

12:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM: A 
Program From and For the Homo- 
sexual Community (Aug. 11) 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #8 Fannie Kelly's 
account read by Ann Rivers. From 
the WBAI Archives. 

1:00 MUSIC OF LUCIANO BERIO I 
Details August 10 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL Last 
night's program, rebroadcast. 

3:00 DEDICATED TO THE ONES WE 
LOVE A poetic conversation. Details 
August 10. 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Ask Alice when she's ten feet tall. 



Madeleine Friedman with more of 
Carrol's Alice in Wonderland. 

5:00 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #6 Performed by Artur 
Schnabel. Sonatas No. 18 in E-Flat 
Major Op. 31, No. 3; No. 19 in G 
Minor, Op. 49, No. 1; No. 20 in G 
Major, Op. 49, No. 2; and No. 21 in 
C Major, Op. 53 ("Waldstein"). (RCA 
Victor LM 9500 15-17) (Aug. 13) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 REPORT TO THE LISTENER 
Frank Millspaugh does it again. (Aug. 
13) 

7:15 MISCELLANY 

7:30 COMMENTARY By Victor Perlo, 
economist and author. (Aug. 13) 

7:45 THE 99.5 RADIO THEATRE: The 
Bobbity-Ba Letters. A dramatic read- 
ing of a thoroughly unlikely corre- 
spondence. One of a series of mythical 
correspondence printed in Punch, this 
was in reality written by Patrick 
Ryan. The dramatis personae consist 
of Randa Heines and Mike Hodel. 
(Aug. 14) 

8:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
BILLY HALOP? One of the original 
"Dead End Kids" (the good-looking 
one) discusses the fact that the boys 
were never good friends. Richard L., 
who was visiting with Halop in Hol- 
lywood, asks about Billy's career in 
radio, playing "Bobby Benson" and the 
disadvantages of the "'Dead End Kid" 
image. (Aug. 13) 

8:30 THE MIND'S EYE THEATER: 
Kindertotenlieder A short play by 
William West about four children of 



the 21st century — or are they? The 
cast includes Deborah Jowitt, Randa 
Haines, Mike Hodel and George 
Spelvin. Directed by B. Searles. (Aug. 
14) 

9:00 CONFRONTATION: WASHING- 
TON Meet the opposition press. Radical 
Washington journalists interview a 
Man-in-the-news if they can find one. 
(Aug. 13) 

9:30 FRANZ BERWALD Overtures and 
tone poems by the lesser-known Swed- 
ish composer of the early 19th century 
as performed by the Orchestra of the 
Swedish Radio conducted by Sixten 
Ehrling. (Aug. 14) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 13) 

11:00 THE 99.5 RADIO THEATRE: 
Dreams of Morning after Glory An 
original comedy by Deborah Jowitt 
and Murray Ralph. Full of sound 
and voices, about an unlikely quin- 
tet of people. The cast: Jack Heller; 
Jane Lowry; Alan Raeburn; Jenny 
Ventriss; Chris Strater; John Wilson; 
Martin Last; Carole Ann Lewis; Judith 
Warner; Baird Searles. Technical pro- 
duction by Sam Sanders. Director, 
Deborah Jowitt. Baird Scales was 
the producer of the 99.5 Radio Thea- 
tre, assisted by Lee Crespi. (Aug. 15) 

11:30 BLACK BLUES If anybody has 
ever heard this program, please send 
us some copy for the Folio. We'd 
listen ourselves, but we'd rather not. 
(Aug. 15) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob Fass 
asks a hippy about his bippy. 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry is 
attacked by a gaggle of phone men. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 12) 

9:15 REPORT TO THE LISTENER By 
Frank Millspaugh. (Aug. 12) 

9:30 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #6 Played by Artur Schna- 
bel. (Aug. 12) 

10:45 COMMENTARY By Victor Perlo. 
(Aug. 12) 

11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
BILLY HALOP? Richard Lamparski 
finds out. Details August 12. 

11:30 JOHNNY WINTER, JOHNNY 
WINTER Sings some songs. Details, 
sort of, August 11. 

12:00 CONFRONTATION: WASHING- 
TON A man-fn-the-news, interviewed 
(hopefully). (Aug. 12) 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #9 Another episode 
in the account by Fannie Kelly read 
by Ann Rivers. 

1:00 THE MAIDS Genet's masterpiece 
performed in French. Details August 
9. (KPFA) 

2:30 AND THE LAST SHALL BE FIRST 
Black poetry. Details August 9. 



4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Sing When the Spirit Says Sing with 
Bob Cohen. 

5:00 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #7 Performed by Artur 
Schnabel. Sonata No. 24 in F-Sharp 
Major, Op. 78; Sonata No. 25 in G 
Major, Op. 79; Sonata No. 26 in E-Flat 
Major, Op. 81a ("Les Adieux") ; Sonata 
No. 22 in F Major, Op. 54; and Sonata 
No. 23 in F Minor, Op. 57 ("Appasio- 
nata"). (RCA Victor LM 9500, 18-21) 
(Aug. 14) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY ON JEWISH AF- 
FAIRS Discussion of a topic of interest 
to members of the Jewish community, 
by a member of same community. 
(Aug. 14) 

7:15 REPORT ON POLITICAL PRIS- 
ONERS By members of Amnesty In- 
ternational. (Aug. 14) 

7:30 LABOR AND THE LAW: Students 

-^ and Workers Is there any common 
ground? A look at organizing efforts 

by radical students in conservative trade 
union turf. (Aug. 14) 

8:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
A Child Went Forth A long dialogue 
between youth and age, set by David 
Sawn, with Bruce Harlow as the Old 
Man and Bob Darchi as the Young 



Boy. Produced by Pauline Braun. Tech- 
nical production by Barry Singer. 

8:45 KABUKI Music from the popular 
theatre of Japan performed by Katsu- 
suji Kineya, Kunitaro Kineya, shami- 
sen, and Matasaji Sumida, Sanji Ume- 
ya, and Shinnojo Rokugo, percussion. 
(Aug. 16) 

9:30 MAGAZINE 99.5 Something im- 
portant, examined in detail by Frank 
Millspaugh and /or Dale Minor and/ 
or Other People. (Aug. 14) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fis- 
cher. (Aug. 14) 

11:00 AN UNEXPURGATED HISTORY 
OF NEW YORK CITY A look at the 
unsung black warriors, the winners 
of the West, the Ninth Regiment and 
the story of the 369th Armory with 
Viola Scott Thomas and Herb Lamb- 
right of Inter-Global News Service. 
Produced by Kay Lindsey. (.\ug. 16) 

11:30 DIANA WALD: A Young Poet 
Reads A college student. Miss Wald 
reads her own poems; gentle, beau- 
tiful poems of young love and ten- 
derness. (Aug. 16) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob Fass 
invites a phone man to dinner in an- 
other attempt to discern if they are 
really human. 



Page 12 



WBAI 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 14 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry 
decides it's time for a New Incident, 
and attacks the Karen Horney Insti- 
tute, our nextdoor neighbors, just for 
the hell of it. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 13) 

9:15 COMMENTARY ON JEWISH AF- 
FAIRS (Aug. 13) 

9:30 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #7 Performed by Artur 
Schnabel. (Aug. 13) 

10:45 REPORT ON POLITICAL PRIS- 
ONERS By members of Amnesty In- 
ternational. (Aug. 13) 

11:00 LABOR AND THE LAW: Students 
and Workers Details August 13. 

11:30 THE 99.5 RADIO THEATRE: 
The Bobbity-Ba Letters A mythical 
correspondence. For details, see August 
12. 

11:45 AN EVENING OF FRENCH SUR- 
REALIST POETRY IN TRANSLA- 
TION The poems of Baudelaire, 
Rimbaud and others. Details August 
11 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #10 Another of 16 
readings of Fannie Kelly's account of 
her capture by a band of Ogalalla 
Sioux when she was 19 years old, in 



1864. Melissa Barlam is the reader. 

1:00 FRANZ BERWALD Overtures and 
tone poems by the 19th century Swed- 
ish composer. Details August 12. 

2:00 MAGAZINE 99.5 Last night's pro- 
gram, rebroadcast. 

3:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
Kindertoteliender The play by William 
West. Details August 12. 

3:30 THE ANGRY INDIANS From 
WBAI's 1961 Archives, a documentary 
from the 1961 Congress of the Amer- 
ican Indian at the Univ. of Chicago. 
(AS 14) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Caryn and David and Watkins Rock. 

5:00 BERGEN FESTIVAL The Cologne 
Chamber Orchestra under Helmuth 
Mueller-Bruehl and the Bergen Sym- 
phony Orchestra under David Gistrakh, 
perform TELEMANN Suite in A Minor 
for flute and strings, and SCHUBERT 
Symphony No. 2. (Aug. 15) 

6:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Announcements of coming events to 
which the public is invited. (Aug. 15) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul. Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY By members of 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Aug. 



15) 

7:15 COMMENTARY By members of 
Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Aug. 15) 

7:30 MIDDLE EAST PRESS REVIEW 
Reviews of the Israeli and Arab Press 
produced by the Broadcasting Founda- 
tion of America in cooperation with 
the Association of Arab Broadcasters 
and Kol Israel. (Aug. 15) 

8:00 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 
A weekly report on fantasy and spec- 
ulative fiction, with emphasis on books 
and magazines, but also the perform- 
ing arts when apropos. Baird Searles 
with Sandra Ley assisting. (Aug. 15) 

8:15 MISCELLANY 

8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN 
CULTURAL REVOLUTION Music, 
talk, phone calls, and lots more, done, 
at whim, by Julius Lester. Phone 
calls, when taken, are in OX 7-8506. 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 15) 

11:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND 
PROGRAM Recorded jazz, presented 
by the lovely lady pianist. (Aug. 15) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Recorded 
unnameables (and sometimes live ones) 
presented by the lovely male D-J. 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 15 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry reads 
fan mail accusing him not only of 
being corney, but horney. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 14) 

9:15 COMMENTARY By members of 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Aug. 
14) 

9:30 BERGEN FESTIVAL Works by 
TELEMANN and SCHUBERT. (Aug. 
14) 

10:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Announcements of coming events. 
(Aug. 14) 

10:45 OF UNICORNS AND UNI- 
VERSES Fantasy and Sci-Fi reviews. 
(Aug. 14) 

11:00 COMMENTARY By members of 
Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Aug. 14) 

11:15 MIDDLE EAST PRESS REVIEW 
Arab and Israeli press reviews. (Aug. 
14) 

11:45 FLUTE CONCERT I OF 18th CEN- 
TURY PARIS Details August 10. 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #11 Another read- 
ing from Fannie Kelly's account of 
just that. Melissa Barlam is the reader. 

1:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND 
PROGRAM Recorded jazz. (Aug. 14) 



2:00 MODEL CITIES: An Experiment 
in Participatory Democracy James 
Farmer, former head of CORE, ex- 
plains the present trend toward social 
and political autonomy for local neigh- 
borhoods within big cities. He dis- 
cusses then the experience of the black 
community within the larger metro- 
politan complex. From the Midway 
#1272 

3:00 THE 99.5 RADIO THEATRE: 
Dreams of Morning After Glory A 
play by Deborah Jowitt and Murray 
Ralph. Details August 12. 

3:30 BLACK BLUES (Aug. 12) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Madeleine Friedman of Alice fame 
reads from Isaac Bashevis Singer's 
When Shlemiel Went to Warsaw. 

5:00 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #8 Performed by Artur 
Schnabel. Sonata No. 27 in E Minor, 
Op. 90; No. 28 in A Major, Op. 101; 
No. 29 in B-FIat Major, Op. 106 
("Hammerklavier"). (RCA Victor LM 
9500) (Aug. 18) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY 
Capitol News discusses capital news! 
(Aug. 16) 



7:30 DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP Betty 
Pilkington provides some of the whys 
and wherefores in the field of interna- 
tional relations by means of inter- 
views with U. N. diplomats, press 
roundtables, etc. (Aug. 16) 

8:00 A SATIRICAL VIEW By Marshall 
Efron. (Aug. 16) 

8:15 MISCELLANY 

8:30 EXPLORER: Music of Southern 
India Three works performed by S. 
Balachander, veena; and Sivaraman, 
mridangam. (Aug. 16) 

9:15 MISCELLANY 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL From 
that department, a program dealing 
with something that happened or crop- 
ped up too late for detailed listing 
here. (Aug. 18) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 16) 

11:00 FREE MUSIC STORE A broad- 
cast of some concert that originally 
took place at a Free Music Store. To 
find out which one, listen. (Aug. 18) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob Fass 
finally comes up with an appropriate 
name for this program only to discover 
it can't be said over the air. 



WBAI 



Page 13 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 16 



8:00 KABUKI Music from the popular 

theater of Japan. Details August 13. 
8:45 EXPLORER: Music of Southern 

India Three works. (Aug. 15) 
9:30 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 

Saturday morning and wouldn't you 

know, another Ronny Watkins show. 
10:30 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 

(Aug. 15) 
10:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW By Marshall 

Efron. (Aug 15) 
11:00 AN ITALIAN POINT OF VIEW 

From WBAI's 1960 Archives, Gian- 

franco Franco of PAESE SERA is 

interviewed by Gene Bruck. (AS #8) 
11:30 COUNTRY MUSIC Smell that 

blue grass (Aug. 10) 
12:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY 

From the Washington Bureau. (Aug. 

15) 
12:30 DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP By 

Betty Pilkington. (Aug. 15) 
1:00 AN UNEXPURGATED HISTORY 

OF NEW YORK CITY By Viola Scott 

Thomas and Herb Lambright. Details 

August 13. 



1:30 DIANA WALD: A Young Poet 
Reads (Aug. 13) 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF JAZZ Hosted by 
Jack McKinney. 

4:00 WITCH'S BLOOD Fredi Dundee 
reads the eighth chapter of William 
Blain's book. 

4:30 J. KRISHNAMURTI The third in 
his series of lectures. (KPFA) 

5:45 REMINISCENCES OF AN EDITOR 
From the 1962 Archives, John Hall 
Wheelock discusses literary notables. 
(AS 2072) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS By 
Sam Julty, a wheeler-dealer if you 
ever saw one. (August 17) 

7:15 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIOD- 
ICALS Reviewed by William Mandel. 
(KPFA) (Aug. 17) 

7:30 THE $24 REFUND A program 
that asks the question, can civilized 
behavior survive in New York, or is 
it already dead? Regular participants 
are the Blue Collar, the Immoderator, 
and others. (Aug. 17) 

7:45 MISCELLANY 

8:00 DAPHNE by RICHARD STRAUSS 

Conducted by Karl Bohm. Cast includes 



Hilda Gueden, James King, and Fritz 
Wunderlich. Tapes courtesy of the As- 
sociation of German Broadcasters. 

9:45 MISCELLANY 

10:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: A 
Man is Many Voices Written and di- 
rected by Richard Hoag, this play 
deals with a man's confrontation with 
his own homosexuality in an unusual 
and stylized fashion. It features Chuck 
Ports, with supporting parts played 
by David Clemens, Sheila Cohen, Ray- 
mond Cole, Thomas Crawley, Fred 
Dykeman, Richard Hoag, Stephanie 
Moss, JoAnn Schuman, Michael Tal- 
cott, and Juliette Whitman. Produced 
by Charles Lewis and Baird Searles. 
Technical direction by Ed Woodard. 

11:30 TO HELL WITH POSTERITY 

Lord Ritchie-Calder, consultant to the 
Center, makes a case for the need to 
apply social responsibility to scientific 
discovery instead of racing pell-mell 
to a finish line that may spell the 
end of civilization as we know it. 
From the Center #467. 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Steve Post rushes 
pell-mell to the finish line, but he 
can't spell "civilization." 



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 17 



8:00 GREAT PERFORMANCES OF THE 
CENTURY MOZART Concerto No. 
4 in D for violin and orchestra Joseph 
Szigeti, violin; London Philharmonic/ 
Sir Thomas Beecham Divertimento 
No. 15 in B-flat Major, K 287 Joseph 
Szigeti, violin; Chamber Orchestra 
Max Geberman. Quartet No. 19 in 
C Major, K 465 Kolisch Quartet. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES Ethnic airs from all over, pres- 
ented by the late Dr. Henry Cowell. 
From the WBAI Archives. 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES Great operatic 
arias, presented by the late Anthony 
Boucher. From the KPFA Archives. 

10:30 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS Sam 
Julty claims cars are autochthonous. 
(Aug. 16) 

11:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIOD- 
ICALS Reviewed by William Mandel. 
(KPFA) (Aug. 16) 

11:15 GERMANY TODAY Presented by 
David Berger. From the Assoc, of 
German Broadcasters. 

11:30 THE $24 REFUND No one would 
buy it back (Aug. 16) 

11:45 MISCELLANY 

12:00 AFRICA'S ANCIENT PEOPLE 
A discussion between Laurens van der 
Post and Colin Turnbull. From the 
1961 Archives. (AL 1524) 

1:00 BUCKMINSTER FULLER: Pro- 
gress Through Fear The third in the 
four-part series of lectures by the ar- 
chitect-philosopher. (KPFA) 

1:45 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT CEN- 
TENNIAL: The Architect and His 
Clients The third of the aeries devoted 



to Wright and his work. In this mont- 
age of comments by owners of his 
buildings, Bruce Radde explores the ex- 
perience of working with the master 
and what it is like to live in his 
buildings. (KPFA) 

2:45 MISCELLANY A challenge to the 
man on the board. 

3:00 LITERATURE, LATIN AMERICA: 
Fernando Alegria The third in this 
series. The Chilean poet and novelist 
(now teaching at Stanford U.) dis- 
cusses the cueca and reads examples 
of lyrics for them. (KPFA) 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY A brief sample 
of what Bob does for hours at night. 

5:00 THE GROUP FOR CONTEMPO- 
RARY MUSIC The Politics of Har- 
mony: A Masque by Charles Wuori- 
nen. "Stolen out of Ancient Authors" 
by Richard Monaco and performed 
by the Group for Contemporary Music 
last October. (Aug. 22) 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC Real downhome 
stuff. (Aug. 23) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 READINGS * FROM THE CON- 
GRESSIONAL RECORD We keep get- 
ting phone calls from people who think 
Bob Kuttner and his fellow thespians 
make this up. From the Wash. Bureau. 
(Aug. 18) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN Kay Lindsey of the News and 
^ Public Affairs Dept. reviews a book 
of recent interest. (Aug. 18) 

7:15 COMMENTARY By Neil Fabricant, 
Legislative Director of the New York 
chapter of the ACLU. (Aug. 18) 

7:30 AFRICA SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 
Produced by Artur Vilankulu, usually 
with guests. (Aug. 18) 



8:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE Covering 

events in the arts, WBAI's reporter- 
reviewers present criticism followed 
by discussions. On hand this week 
will probably be Deborah Jowitt for 
dance, Murray Ralph for music, Tom 
Borek for autres choses and Roger 
Greenspan for films. Baird Searles 
will moderate. (Aug. 18) 

8:45 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
NEW YORK, New York, new york 
The Word Players with words from 
many sources on and about NYC. 
The work is in three movements with 
an improvised verite interlude. The 
Players are Sandra Ley, Dona Marens, 
Albert Norton and Julie Scherer, di- 
rected by B. Searles. Technical pro- 
duction by Fred Friedman. (Aug. 20) 

9:30 MUSIC OF LUCIANO BERIO II 
Thema (Omaggio a Joyce); Momenti; 
Differences, Visage. Produced at Stu- 
dio di Fonologia Musicale of RAI, 
Milan. Tapes courtesy of RAI. (Aug. 
19) 

10:30 MUSICA VIVA LATINA Salzman 
South of the border. (Aug. 18) 

11:00 NEW AMERICAN REVIEW Read- 
ings of or discussions about pieces 
that appear in the paperback maga- 
zine. Produced jointly by WBAI and 
the New American Library. (Aug. 18) 

11:30 THE 99.5 RADIO THEATRE: 
"Mother" A black and white comedy 
by Don DeLillo, the first production 
of WBAI's theater company. The cast: 
Frank Whitemen, Holly Turner and 
Joan Farber. Directed by Chris Strater. 
Technical production by Sam Sanders. 
Produced by Baird Searles. (Aug. 21) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE With America's 
youngest oldman, Steve Post. 



Page 14 



WBAI 



MONDAY, AUGUST 18 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry uses 
four-letter words, such as "food". 

9:00 COMMENTARY By Neil Fabricaiit. 
(Aug. 17) 

9:15 READINGS FROM THE CON- 
GRESSIONAL RECORD From Wash- 
ington Bob. (Aug 17) 

9:30 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #8 Three of them, per- 
formed by Artur Schnabel. (Aug. 15) 

10:45 MISCELLANY 

11:00 AFRICA SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 
With Artur Vilankulu. (Aug 17) 

11:30 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE Re- 
views of the week in the arts. (Aug 
17) 

12:15 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN A Lindsey review. (Aug. 17) 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #18 Melissa Bar- 
lam reads the further adventures of 
Fannie Kelly, who experienced the 
former with the latter. 

1:00 THE FREE MUSIC STORE A 
rebroadcast of last Friday's program. 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 

rebroadcast of the Aug. 15 program. 

3:00 MUSICA VIVA LATINA What 



Salzman sends us. (Aug. 17) 

3:30 NEW AMERICAN REVIEW Re- 
broadcast from last night. 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Richard Schiffman and his guests pre- 
sent The Real Story, as they see it, 
about high school. Calls will be taken 
on OX 7-8506. 

5:00 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #9 Artur Schnabel com- 
pletes this series with Sonata No. 30 
in E Major, Op. 109; Sonata No. 31 
in A-Flat Major, Op. 110; and Sonata 
No. 32 in C Minor, Op. 111. (RCA 
Victor LM 9500) (Aug. 19) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY By Conrad Lynn, 
attorney to the revolutionary left. 
(Aug. 19) 

7:15 RENT AND HOUSING IN THE 
CITY: It's a Nice Place to Visit, 
But ... A discussion of landlord- 
tenant troubles from the Metropolitan 
Council on Housing. (Aug. 19) 

7:30 DANCE, NEW YORK A weekly 
program devoted to dance, with inter- 
views and panel discussions covering 
the many facets of that field, here. 
Produced and presented by Marian 
Horosko. (."^ug. 19) 



8:00 MILITARY MONITOR Assess- 
ments of the Pentagon's latest shenan- 
igans, produced by Bob Kuttner of 
the Washington Bureau with the as- 
sistance of the Institute for Policy 
Studies. (Aug. 19) 

8:30 DARMOUTH CONGREGATION OF 
THE ARTS ALBERTO GINASTERA 
Concerto for violin and orchestra. Op. 
30; Sinfonia "Don Rodrigo" for so- 
prano and orchestra. Op. 31b. (Aug. 
20) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL An 
"open hour" to be filled with the latest 
good program from the News and 
P. A. Dept. (Aug. 19) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 19) 

11:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM: A Pro- 
gram From and For the Homosexual 
Community An interview or panel dis- 
cussion bearing on the many aspects 
of homosexual life. Possible also, read- 
ings, documentaries, news and reviews. 
(Aug. 19) 

11:30 THE FOURTH ESTATE Black 
reporters engage conversational and/ 
or militant guests in a relevant inter- 
view. (Aug 19) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob Fass 
lights your fire with a defective Zippo. 



aoooooooooooooeooeoo Q ooooo ci oooooooooooooo o ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo e oooooi 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 19 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry tap- 
dances with bare feet. A first! — 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 18) 

9:15 COMMENTARY By Conrad Lynn. 
(Aug. 18) 

9:30 THE PIANO SONATAS OF BEE- 
THOVEN #9. They are described in 
some detail in the .8/18 5:00 p.m. 
listing. The performer is named there 
too. 

10:45 RENT AND HOUSING IN THE 
CITY: It's a Nice Place to Visit, 
But ... A rebroadcast of last night's 
program. 

11:00 MILITARY MONITOR Also a re- 
broadcast from last night. 

11:30 TO HELL WITH POSTERITY 

Lord Ritchie-Calder on air pollution. 
(Aug. 16) 

12:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM A Pro- 
gram From and For the Homosexual 
Community From August 18. 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #13 Now it's Julie 
Scherer's tui-n to read Fannie Kelly. 

1:00 MUSIC OF LUCIANO BERIO II 

Four short works. For details, see 
August 17. 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL Re- 
broadcast from last night. 

3:00 DANCE, NEW YORK The August 



18 program. 
3:30 THE FOURTH ESTATE Last 

night's program. 
4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 

More Alice In Wonderland, read by 



Madeleine Friedman. 
5:00 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE: 

LESTRINA (Aug. 20) 
6:15 MISCELLANY 
6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 



PA- 



HOUSTON DAY 

Beginning tonight, and continuing until Wednesday at midnight, WBAI will be 
devoting itself to the promotion of a Pacifica station in Houston. Texas. (See Folio 
Notes for a statement from Larry Lee, the prospective manager). During this time 
we will pre-empt some of our prime-time programs to broadcast the kind of 
programs the Houston station will produce. A brief description of them is given 
here. As we go to press, we can't tell you the times they will be on the air. 

A CONVERSATION WITH LAWRENCE GOODWYN Mr. Goodwyn, an Austin 
historian and social critic, discusses the need for a new black history in the Texas 
context, one that will record the slaughter of black voters in East Texas during 
the twilight of populism. 

WALT ROSTOW'S SCHOOL DAYS Author A. C. Greene becomes a student in 
a TV seminar conducted by this former member of the Great Society, now in refuge 
at the Univ. of Texas in Austin. He tells what the learned. 

THE WRONG RAINBOW B. T. Bonner, a black man who has given most of his 
life to the civil rights struggle, talks about the modes of repression employed by 
Houston's white establishment to maintain the status quo. 

H.I.S.D. A documentary on the Houston Independent School District, the sixth 
largest in the country. The H.I.S.D. recently killed a free-lunch program for poor 
children, claiming money was not available. Several days later it voted for an 
increase of $25,000 in legal fees to maintain segregation. 

THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF LEE OTIS JOHNSON Mr. Johnson is a black 
activist who angered the mayor and the chief of police in Houston. A documentary 
on Johnson's entrapment on the charge of possession of one marijuana cigarette and 
sentence of 30 years, and efforts to free him. 

THE FOLK THING A sampling of picking and singing by members of the Houston 

Folklore Society. 



WBAI 



Page 15 



TOVVNES VAN ZANDT AT HOME A Houston folk-country singer talks with a 
friend and they play some of his music. 

MANCE LIPSCOMB AND LIGHTNIN' HOPKINS Two of the fathers of the 
blues talk about where their music came from. 

LOMAX OS THE ROAD The sons of John Lomax — Alan and John, Jr. — talk 
about their folklorist father, the first American to systematically collect folk songs. 
Among the artists discovered was Huddie Ledbetter in a Louisiana prison. 
A YANKEE PRIEST LOOKS AT HOUSTON' Fr. Larry Carney offers an out- 
lander's look at the South's biggest city and its mixture of technology, wealth and 
poverty. 

WHAT I WANTED/WHAT I GOT Vassar Miller, a Texas poet, writes liturgical 
poems that are an un-worshipful celebration of her stance toward a personal God. 
Although Miss Miller lives with an affliction that makos conversation a herculean 
task, she speaks of her life and reads her favorite work. 

In addition to these recorded programs, there will be live visits from staff members 
and supporters of the future station. It will be a bit confused, but lively. Tuesday 
night's News and War Summary will certainly be on, and maybe Bob Sitton and 
Confrontation: Washington. We're putting Wednesday's schedule down in full, 
although we don't know how much of it you'll hear. 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry casts 
his thoughts to the wind and pollutes 
the air. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 19) 

9:15 REPORT TO THE LISTENER A 
tale of woe. (Aug. 19) 

9:30 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE: PA- 
LESTRINA (August 19) 

10:45 COMMENTARY By Victor Perlo. 
(Aug. 19) 

11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
"JACK ARMSTRONG, THE ALL- 
AMERICAN BOY"? (Aug. 19) 



11:30 THE MOVIES (Aug. 19) 

12:00 CONFRONTATION: WASHING- 
TON (Aug. 19) 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #14 

1:00 DARTMOUTH CONGREGATION 
OF THE ARTS (Aug. 18) 

2:00 ARTS EXTRA A rebroadcast of 
last night's program. 

3:00 MISCELLANY 

3:15 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
NEW YORK, New York, new york 
The Word Players depict it. (Aug. 17) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Join Bob Cohen, the friendly spirit, 
and Sing When the Spirit Says Sing., 

5:00 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE: 
Gabrieli and The Venetians and The 



German Lied From the DGG Archive 
Series. (ARC 3154, 3075) (Aug. 21) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY ON JEWISH AF- 
FAIRS By various members of the 
organized and unorganized Jewish com- 
munity. (Aug. 21) 

7:15 REPORT ON POLITICAL PRIS- 
ONERS Researched and presented hy 
Amnesty International. (Aug. 21) 

7:30 CAVEAT EMPTOR Produced by 
Bob Kuttner, from the Washington 
Bureau, an assessment of the Nixon 
Administration's consumer policies. 
(Aug. 21) 

8:00 MUSIC EXTRA A recent release 
that the Dept. approves of. (Aug. 21) 

8:30 ARTISTS AGAINST THE EX- 
PRESSWAY An open discussion 
against the proposal to build a lower 
Manhattan expressway held at the 
V/hitney Museum on June 19 of this 
year. (Aug. 21) 

9:30 MAGAZINE 99.5 Mr. Millspaugh 
and/or Mr. Minor discuss the Houston 
Station. (Aug. 21) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 21) 

11:00 AN UNEXPURGATED HISTORY 
OF NEW YORK CITY Viola Scott 
Thomas and Herb Lambright outline 
the history of the 314-year-old Ele- 
mendorf Reform Church at 121st Street 
between Lexington and Third Avenues. 
(Aug. 22) 
11:30 BLACK BLUES A series that 

has no copy with it. (Aug. 22) 
12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE A pro- 
gram that needs no copy. 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 21 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry loses 
his temper and asks everyone to look 
for it. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 20) 

9:15 COMMENTARY ON JEWISH AF- 
FAIRS A rebroadcast of Wednesday's 
program. 

9:30 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE: GA- 
BRIELI and THE VENETIANS and 
The German Lied Lovely old songs. 
(Aug. 20) 

10:45 REPORT ON POLITICAL PRIS- 
ONERS From Amnesty International 
(Aug. 20) 

11:00 CAVEAT EMPTOR A look at con- 
sumer affairs. (Aug. 20) 

11:30 THE 99.5 RADIO THEATRE: 
"Mother" A black and white comedy. 
For details, see August 17. 

12:00 MUSIC EXTRA From last night. 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #15 Fannie Kelly's 
account of her stay with the Sioux 
read by Julie Scherer. 

1:00 SPECIAL SOUNDS OF TODAY 
Elisabeth Vandermei and Marzette 
Watts. (Aug. 19) 



2:00 MAGAZINE 99.5 A rebroadcast 
of whatever happened under this 
title last night. 

3:00 ARTISTS AGAINST THE EX- 
PRESSWAY For names, see listing 
for August 20. 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Watkins Rock. 

5:00 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE: The 
ELIZABETHANS From the DGG 
Archive Series, Four Little Short Songs 
from Thomas Morley's "First Book 
of Ayres." Performed by Rene Soa- 
mes, tenor; Walter Gerwig, lute; 
Johannes Koch, viola da gamba. Also, 
several anthems, madrigals and fan- 
tasies of ORLANDO GIBBONS, per- 
formed by the .\Ifred Deller Consort 
and the Consort of Viols of the Schola 
Cantorum Basiliensis. (ARC 3004, 
3053) (Aug. 22) 

6:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Announcements of events you're in- 
vited to. (Aug. 22) 
^:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY By members of 
the Young Americans for Freedom. 
(Aug. 22) 

7:15 COMMENTARY By members of 
the Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Aug. 22) 

7:30 MIDDLE EAST PRESS REVIEW 



Reviews of the Israeli and Arab press, 
produced by the Broadcasting Founda- 
tion of America in cooperation with 
the Assoc, of Arab Broadcasters and 
Kol Israel. (Aug. 22) 

8:00 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 
A weekly suvey of fantasy and spec- 
ulative fiction . . . books, magazines, 
and in films, on stage and TV, and 
wherever else pertinent material may 
manifest itself, Baird Searles presides, 
assisted todav by Peter Robinson. 
(Aug. 22) 

8:15 MISCELLANY 

8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN 
CULTURAL REVOLUTION Julius 
Lester talks, interviews people, plays 
records and takes phone calls. When 
the latter activity is it, the number 
is OX 7-8506. 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 22) 

11:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
Dying Words The Pacifica Word Play- 
ers on death, in five movements: 
Statistical, Literary. Anthropological, 
Camp and Reality, Sources range from 
the Book of the Dead to the World 
.\lmanac. Produced and directed by 
Baird Searles. (Aug. 22) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob Fass 
brings you back to life. 



Page 16 



WBAI 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 22 



7:00 IN THE BEOrNNING Larry rises 
to new depths. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 21) 

9:15 COMMENTARY By members of 
the Y. A. F. (Aug. 21) 

9:30 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE: THE 
ELIZABETHANS Morley and other 
good things. For details, see August 
21 listing. 

10:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
A rebroadcast of last night's award- 
winner. 

10:45 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 
Science fiction and fantasy review. 
(Aug. 21) 

11:00 COMMENTARY By members of 
the SDS. (Aug. 21) 

11:15 MIDDLE EAST PRESS REVIEW 
From last night. 

11:45 THE GROUP FOR CONTEMPOR- 
ARY MUSIC A work by Wuorinen. 
For the right name, see August 17. 

12:30 MY CAPTIVITY AMONG THE 
SIOUX INDIANS #16 The last epi- 
sode of the account of Fannie Kelly's 
experiences when she was taken captive 
in 1864. The reader is Julie Scherer. 
This series came from the WBAI 
Archives. 

1:00 BLACK BLUES What was played 
on August 20, replayed. 

1:30 UNEXPURGATED HISTORY OF 
NEW YORK CITY Thomas and Lam- 
bright on the Elemendorf Church. 
(Aug. 20) 

2:00 CENTRALIZATION — DECEN- 
TRALIZATION: Not Mutually Ex- 
clusive The Rev. Andrew Young of 




Flower of August - POPPY 



the Southern Christian Leadership 
Conference discusses the issue, using 
the urban migration of black America 
as a case in point. From the Midway 
1273. 

3:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
Dying Words The Word Players play 
with words on death. (Aug. 21) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Madeleine Friedman reads from Isaac 
Bashevis Singer's When Shiemiel Went 
to Warsaw. 

5:00 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE: At the 
Imperial Court of Maximillian I and 
Byrd's Virginal Music From the DGG 
Archive series, court instrumental and 
vocal music by ISAAC, BRUMEL, JOS- 
QUIN, OBRECHT, et al. Performed 



by the Wiener Sangerknaben and the 
Chorus Viennensis under Uwe Mund, 
and the Concentus Musicus Vienna, 
under Nicolaus Harnoncourt. Also, 
Virginal music by WILLIAM BYRD 
from "Parthenia" and "My Ladye 
Nevells Booke", performed by Lady- 
Jeans. (ARC 73223, 73201) (Aug. 25) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY 
What's up in Washington this week, 
produced and presented by Bob Kutt- 
ner. (Aug. 23) 

7:30 DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP Betty 
Pilkington provides some of the whys 
and wherefores in the field of interna- 
tional relations. (Aug. 23) 

8:00 A SATIRICAL VIEW Comments 
on recent events by Marshall Efron 
and Dennis Longwell. (Aug. 28) 

8:15 MISCELLANY 

8:30 COMMENTARY by members of 
the Black Panther Party. (Aug. 23) 

8:45 EXPLORER: Shiniehi Yuise Koto 
klassiks by a master. Included: Zan- 
getsu, Fukl, Midare, Akikaze and 
Chidori. (None. H72008) (Aug. 23) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL An 
hour left open for a program of im- 
mediate importance from the News 
and Public Affairs Dept. (Aug. 25) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 23) 

11:00 THE FREE MUSIC STORE Good 
things done last winter and spring 
at the Shakespeare Festival Theater, 
Recorded by Mike Edl and/or John 
Ackley. (Aug. 25) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob talks, 
and talks, and talks, and talks, 
and . . . 



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SATURDAY, AUGUST 23 



8:00 GREAT PERFORMANCES OF 
THE CENTURY Toscanini conducts 
BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 1 in C 
Major. Op. 21; Symphony No. 4 in 
B Flat Major. Op. 60 Petri plays 
BRAHMS Variations on a Paganini 
Caprice, in 2 Books, Op. 35. 

9:30 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Ronny Watkins with Saturday song. 

10:30 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 22) 

10:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW By Marshall 
Efron. (Aug. 22) 

11:00 MISCELLANY 

11:15 COMMENTARY By members of 
the Black Panther Party. (Aug. 22) 

11:30 COUNTRY MUSIC The BAI 
mountain boys at the console. (Aug. 
17) 

12:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY 
From the Washington Bureau, who 
considers the past week in Washing- 
ton — considers it a failure, in fact. 
(Aug. 22) 

12:30 DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP By 



Betty Pilkington. (Aug. 22) 

1:00 EXPLORER: Shiniehi Yuize, Koto 
Master Mastery over Zangetsu, 
Puki, Midare, Akikaze, and Chidori. 
(Nonesuch H-72008) (Aug. 22) 

1:45 MISCELLANY 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF FOLK MUSIC 
Israel Young and his folk musicians. 

4:00 WITCH'S BLOOD The ninth chap- 
ter of Williams Blain's book about a 
witch and the town she cursed. Fredi 
Dundee it the reader. 

4:30 J. KRISHNAMURTI The fourth 
in a series of talks at the Berkeley 
Community Theatre. 

5:45 WHITE HORSES OF VIENNA 
Kay Boyle's story read by Lisa Kolb 
Liebert. (AS 2083) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS Sam 
Julty gives everyone a rather jolty 
ride. (Aug. 24) 

7:00 MISCELLANY 

7:15 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIOD- 
ICALS William Mandel of the Sociol- 
ogy Department, University of Cali- 
fornia at Berkeley, translates and in- 
terprets the press of the USSR. 



(KPFA) (Aug. 24) 

7:30 THE $24 REFUND The Voice of 
the Cliff-Dweller and that of the 
Human Filing Cabinet combine in 
dolorous wail o\ev the miseries of 
city life. (Aug. 24) 

7:45 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
Monuments Eight monologues by 
Diane Di Prima, written at different 
times, and first assembled at the 
Cafe Cino. Now gathered into an 
artistic package for the listener's 
delectation. (Aug. 24) 

9:00 DEBORAH An opera by G. F. 
Handel. Tapes courtesy of Assoc, of 
German Broadcasters. 

11:15 MISCELLANY 

11:30 THE CHOICE: SAVE OUR CONS- 
TITUTION OR SAVE OUR ENVI- 
RONMENT A desperate plea to put a 
halt to the destruction of the ecolo- 
gical balance before we reach the im- 
minent point of no return. W. H. Ferry 
reads the text of his remarks before 
the Senate Subcommitte on Intergov- 
ernmental Affairs. (From the Center) 
(Aug. 27) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Steve models his 
new see-through performance. 



WBAI 



Page 17 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 24 



8:00 GREAT PERFORMANCES OF 
THE CENTURY Excerpts from Par- 
sifal at Bayreuth in 1927 as conducted 
by Karl Muck and Siegfried Wagner. 
Hans Hotter sings BACH Cantata 
No. 82: Ich habe genug Hans Hotter, 
baritone; Geraint Jones, organ; Sidney 
Sutcliffe, oboe; Philharmonia String 
Orchestra/Anthony Bernard. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES The late Dr. Henry Cowell, 
who presents ethnic music from the 
wide world. (WBAI Archives) 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES Those of the 
operatic stars of the past on the re- 
cordings of Anthony Boucher. (KPFA 
Archives) 

10:30 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS By 
Sam Julty. (Aug. 23) 

10:45 MISCELLANY 

11:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIOD- 
ICALS Reviewed by William Mandel. 
(KPFA) (Aug. 23) 

11:15 GERMANY TODAY David Berger 
with tapes from the Association of 
German Broadcasters. 

11:30 THE $24 REFUND With and 
for beleaguered city dwellers. (Aug. 
23) 

11:45 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
Monuments Eight dramatic monolo- 
gues written by Diane Di Prima. 
(Aug. 23) 

1:00 BUCKMINSTER FULLER: A Re- 
volution in Design The final part of 
the series by the noted architect and 
philosopher. (KPFA) 

2:00 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT CEN- 
TENNIAL: An Evaluation An attempt 



to evaluate the work of this contro- 
versial 20th-century figure by Bruce 
Radde, historian, and Walter Horn, 
professor. Observations, too, by Mies 
van der Rohe, Eero Saarinen, Philip 
Johnson, and Eric Mendelson. (KPFA) 

3:00 LITERATURE, LATIN AMERICA: 
Spanish Poetry One poem of the 16th 
century, the rest modern (Lorca, Ni- 
colas Guillen, Octavio Paz) read in 
English by Shaun Gordon and in 
Spanish by Hugo Carrillo. 

3:30 LEE HATFIELD Improvisations 
on the poems of Petronius. (AS 2126) 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY Bob Fass in 
full daytime dress, with his guests 
from the evening hours. 

5:00 GUILLAUME DE MACHAUT The 
London Ambrosian Singers conducted 
by John McCarthy sing MACHAUT's 
Notre Dame Mass and the Gregorian 
proper for the Feast of the Assump- 
tion. (None. H-71185) (Aug. 29) 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC Something for 
those who can't stand R&R, R&B, 
psychedelic, folk, jazz . . . (Aug. 30) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 READINGS FROM THE CON- 
GRESSIONAL RECORD This pro- 
gram will probably not reflect your 
Representative's voting record, but 
you may get a laugh or two over the 
rhetoric. (Aug. 25) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN Judy Ratner reviews some re- 
cently published cookbooks. (Aug. 25) 

7:15 COMMENTARY By Neil Fabricant, 
Legislative Director of the New York 
ACLU. (Aug. 25) 

7:30 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS 
David Rothenberg and other members 
of The Fortune Society discuss the 



social problems of the ex-con. (Aug. 
25) 

8:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE Those 
hypercritical people attack the arts 
they really (really, folks) admire. 
Tonight's critics, kept under Baird 
Searles' tight control, are Ron Nelson 
for theatre, Al Lees for film, and two 
volunteers for the remainder of the 
broadcast. Human sacrifice? (Aug. 
25) 

8:45 1968 SALZBURG EASTER FES- 
TIVAL: A German Requiem Perform- 
ance of BRAHMS' German Requiem 

at the Festival with the Berliner 
Philharmonic conducted by Herbert 
Von Karajan. From the Association of 
German Broadcasters. (Aug. 27) 

10:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 

The Language of Flowers Victorian 
flower poetry given the special in- 
terpretation of the Word Players, 
who also divulge the secret meanings 
behind each lovely blossom. Partici- 
pating in the nosegay are David 
Haight, Sandra Ley, Sherry Pockell, 
Ann Rivers, Judith Seto, Edgar Walk- 
er, and Charles Wallrich. Produced 
and directed by Baird Searles. (Aug. 
25) 

10:30 MUSICA VIVA LATINA Salzman 
South of the Border. (Aug. 25) 

11:00 MORE BAROQUE TRUMPETS 
Including works by ANONYMOUS, 
TORELLI, FRANCESCHINI, CHAR- 
PENTIER, ALTENBURG, FASH, 
and HANDEL, (Aug. 26) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Wake up this 
Monday morning to the happy sound 
of Steve. Monday morning ? Yes, 
Monday morning. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 25 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry com- 
municates via Rice Crispies. 

9:00 READINGS FROM THE CON- 
GRESSIONAL RECORD It's more 
painful in the morning. (Aug. 24) 

9:15 COMMENTARY By Neil Fabricant. 
(Aug. 24) 

9:30 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE: At 
the Imperial Court of Maximillian 1 
and Byrd's Virginal Music For elabo- 
rate details, see last Friday's evening 
concert listing 

10:45 MISCELLANY 

11:00 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS 
Presented by the Fortune Society. 
(Aug. 24) 

11:30 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE Re- 
view of the arts (Aug. 24) 

12:15 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN J. Ratner cum cookbooks. 
(Aug. 24) 

12:30 LETTERS FROM CONSTANTI- 
NOPLE #1 First in a series of three 
readings of the book by Lady Mary 
Wortley Montagu. The reader is ac- 
tress Kathleen Dalton. 

1:00 THE FREE MUSIC STORE A 
rebroadcast of Friday's program. 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL 
Fridays night's news special, rebroad- 
cast. 

3:00 MUSICA VIVA LATINA Salz- 



man South of the Border. (Aug 24) 

3:30 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: The 
Langange of Flowers A rebroadcast 
of last night's program by the Word 
Players. 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Book reviews and things to do for 
kids and their parents on Kid Stuff. 

5:00 J. S. BACH: The Cantatas From 
the DGG Archive series, Cantata No. 
51, "Jauchzet Gott in alien Landen" 
and Cantata No. 202, "Weichet nur, 
betrubte Schatten." Performed by so- 
prano Maria Stader. Also, the Cantata, 
"Jesu, der du meine Seele", BWV 
78, performed by the Munich Bach 
Choir, soloists ensemble of the Bach 
Festival Ansbach. The Munich Bach 
Orchestra is under the direction of 
Karl Richter. (ARC 3144, 3197) (Aug. 
26) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY By Conrad Lynn, 
civil rights lawyer. (Aug. 26) 

7:15 RENT AND HOUSING IN THE 
CITY . . . It's a Nice Place to Visit. 
But . . . News and commentary on 
various aspects of the problem in 
New York. Produced by the Metro- 
politan Council on Housing. (Aug. 26) 

7:30 DANCE, NEW YORK A weekly 
program devoted to various aspects 
of the dance. Produced and presented 
bv Marian Horosko. (Aug. 26) 

8:00 THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 



AND URBAN AMERICA A look at 
the new, post-Watts urban affairs 
establishment, with emphasis on the 
Urban Institute, Urban America. Inc., 
and the politics of inelevance. Pro- 
duced by Bob Kuttner of the Wash. 
Bureau. (Aug. 26) 

9:00 HPSCHD For harpsichords and 
computer-generated tapes. By JOHN 
CAGE and LEJAREN HILLER. Harp- 
sichordists: Antoinette Vischer, Neely 
Bruce and David Tudor. (LISTEN. 
S. P.) (Aug. 26) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL An 
hour left open for a program of im- 
portance from the News and Public 
Affairs Dept. (Aug. 26) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 26) 

11:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM: A Pro- 
gram From and For the Homosexual 
Community A subjective look at homo- 
sexual life with readings, discussions, 
interviews, news and reviews. (Aug. 
26) 

11:30 AN UNEXPURGATED HISTORY 
OF NEW YORK CITY The first black 
citizens or the real beginning of the 
melting pot as researched by Viola 
Scott Thomas and Herb Lambright 
of the Inter-Global News Service. 
(Aug. 26) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob 
shows you how to read without mov- 
ing your lips. 



Page 18 



WBAI 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 26 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry de- 
monstrates how to eat celery silently. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 25) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn. 
(Aug. 25) 

9:30 J. S. BACH: The Cantatas The 
first three of a brief festival. Details, 
August 25. 

10:45 RENT AND HOUSING IN THE 
CITY: It's A Nice Place to Visit, 
But . . . Produced by the Metropolitan 
Council on Housing. (Aug. 25) 

11:00 AN UNEXPURGATED HISTORY 
OF NEW YORK CITY Details, Au- 
gust 25. 

11:30 HPSCHD Music for harpsichords 
and computer-generated tapes. (Aug. 
25) 

12:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM: A Pro- 
gram From and For the Homosexual 
Community (Aug. 25) 

12:30 LETTERS FROM CONSTANTI- 
NOPLE #2 Lady Mary read by Kath- 
leen Dalton. 

1:00 MORE BAROQUE TRUMPETS 
For names of composers, see August 
24. 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
rebroadcast of last night's program. 



3:00 THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 
AND URBAN AMERICA The Wash- 
ington Bureau looks at the urban af- 
fairs establishment. (Aug. 25) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Alice in Wonderland, read by Madeleine 
Friedman. 

5:00 J. S. BACH: The Cantatas From 
the DGG Archive series, Cantatas No. 
39, "Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot," 
No. 45, "Es ist dir gesagt, Mensch, 
was gut ist," No. 105, "Herr, gehe 
nicht ins Gericht" and No. 8, 'Liebster 
Gott, wann ward' ich sterben." The 
Solistengemeinschaft der Bachwoche 
Ansbach and the Munich Bach-Chorus 
are under the direction of Karl Richter. 
The Berlin Philharmonic and Mott- 
enchor are under Wilhelm Rust. (ARC 
3066, 3145) (Aug. 27) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 REPORT TO THE LISTENER 
Church news, reported by the sexton; 
broadcasting news, reported by the 
station manager. (Aug. 27) 

7:15 MISCELLANY 

7:30 COMMENTARY By Victor Perlo, 
author and economist. (Aug. 27) 

7:45 MISCELLANY 

8:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
DUNCAN RENALDO? "The Cisco 
Kid" left his Santa Barbara ranch 
to visit with Richard Lamparski at 



the KPFK studios. They discuss the 
legendary production of "Trader Horn" 
and the career of the Spanish actor 
from his days as a silent star to his 
success on television. (Aug. 27) 

8:30 FREDERICK DOUGLASS SPEAKS 
ON SLAVERY Leslie Perry of the 
Drama Dept. (Univ. of Calif., Berke- 
ley) reads the words of the ex-slave, 
orator, newspaper publisher and states- 
man. (KPFA) (Aug. 27) 

9:00 CONFRONTATION: WASHING- 
TON Know your enemy. Confrontation 
(in the guise of Bob Kuttner) chats 
with an unfriendly Congresssman. 
(Aug. 27) 

9:30 ANTI-BALLISTIC MISSILE RAL- 
LY Speakers, at the rally held in 
June of this year are: Sen. Albert 
Gore, Charles Goodel, George Wald 
of Harvard and Jerome Weisner of 
M. I.T. (Aug. 27) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 27) 

11:00 EXPLORATIONS IN COMPUT- 
ER-SOUND Dr. Max Mathews of Bell 
Telephone Labs speaks of the com- 
puter's possibilities for music and 
gives examples. Produced for Pacifi- 
ca by Ann McMillan. (Aug. 28) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob Fass 
becomes the life of the party. Un- 
fortunately, there's no party. 



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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry licks 
his tongue — and that's half the 
battle. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 26) 

9:15 REPORT TO THE LISTENER A 

rebroadcast of last night's program. 

9 :30 J. S. BACH The Cantatas Numbers 
39, 45, 105 and 8. For more informa- 
tion, see August 26 listing. 

10:45 COMMENTARY By Victor Perlo. 
(Aug. 26) 

11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
DUNCAN RENALDO? Richard talks 
with the movie star. (Aug. 26) 

11:30 THE CHOICE: Save Our Cons- 
titution or Save Our Environment? 

A talk on the ecological balance. From 
the Center. (Aug. 23) 

12:00 CONFRONTATION: WASHING- 
TON A chat with an unfriendly Con- 
gressman. (Aug 26) 

12:30 LETTERS FROM CONSTANTI- 
NOPLE #3 Lady Mary Wortley Mon- 
tagu read by actress Kathleen Dalton. 

1 :00 1968 SALZBURG EASTER FESTI- 



VAL: A German Requiem It's Brahms'. 
Details, August 24. 

2:15 FREDERICK DOUGLASS SPEAKS 
ON SLAVERY A recreation of a 
Douglas speech. (KPFA) (Aug. 26) 

2:45 MISCELLANY 

3:00 ANTI-BALLISTIC MISSILE RAL- 
LY A recording of the June meeting. 
Details, August 26. 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 

Time once again to join Bob Cohen 
and Sing When the Spirit Saiys Sing. 

5:00 BACH: The Cantatas From the 
DGG Archive series, Cantata No. 147, 
"Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben," 
Cantata No. 60, "0 Ewigkeit, du Don- 
nerwort," and Cantata No. 56, "Ich 
will den Kreuzstab gerne tragen." 
Karl Richter conducts the Munich 
Bach Choir and Orchestra and the 
Solistengemeinschaft der Bachwoche 
Ansbach. Karl RistenpErt conducts 
the Berlin Kammerorchester and Mot- 
ettenchor. (ARC 3231, 3058) (Aug. 
28) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY ON JEWISH AF- 
FAIRS By a representative of the 
organized (or of the unorganized) 



Jewish community. (Aug. 28) 

7:15 REPORT ON POLITICAL PRIS- 
ONERS Presented by a representa- 
tive of Amnesty International. (Aug. 
28) 

7:30 THE GREAT DOG CATCHER 
"NAPPING" A musical comedy for 
adults and children by Rod Coneybeare. 
(CBC) (Aug. 28) 

8:00 THE MONTH IN REVIEW Pre- 
sented by the editors of Monthly Re- 
view. (Aug. 28) 

8:30 NEW YORK CITY We always 
try to end the month on a happy 
note; e. g., this program on the pro- 
blems of living in this megalopolis. 
(Aug. 28) 

9:30 MAGAZINE 99.5 Sometimes called 
Public Affairs Special, this is a pro- 
gram of discussion and comment or 
inteview on a matter of current im- 
portance. (Aug. 28) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 

(Aug. 28) 

11:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND 
PROGRAM Music and talk with the 
lovely lady. (Aug 29) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob gives 
you a big, happy grin. 



WBAI 



Page 19 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 28 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry tells 
you all about treacle. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 27) 

9:15 COMMENTARY ON JEWISH AF- 
FAIRS Rebroadcast from last night. 

9:30 BACH: The Cantatas Numbers 
147, 60, and 56. For amplified details, 
see listing for August 27. 

10:45 REPORT ON POLITICAL PRIS- 
ONERS From August 27. 

11:00 THE MONTH IN REVIEW From 
last night. 

11:30 NEW YORK CITY Last night's 
hour, over again. 

12:30 HEYWOOD HALE BROUN The 

actor, writer and sports commenta- 
tor reads form his book A Studied 
Madness. (Doubleday) 

1:00 EXPLORATIONS IN COMPUTER- 
SOUND Dr. Max Mathews explains, 
with examples. (Aug. 26) 

2:00 MAGAZINE 99.5 Last night's in- 
terview or discussion, rebroadcast. 

3:00 THE GREAT DOG CATCHER 
"NAPPING" A musical comedy. (Aug. 



27) 

3:30 V. S. PRITCHETB: The author talks 
with Erik Wensber^. From the 1963 
Archives (AS 2128) 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 

An hour of rock both old and new, 
as Caryn and David present Watkins 
Rock. 

5:00 BACH: The Cantatas From the 
DGG Archive series, Cantata No. 1, 
"Wie schoen leuchtet der Morgens- 
tern" and Cantata No. 4, "Christ Lag 
in Todesbandeden. Soloists: Gunthild 
Weber, soprano: Helmut Krebs, tenor; 
Herman Schey, bass; Dietrich Fischer- 
Dieskau, baritone. Fritz Lehmann con- 
ducts the Berlin Philharmonic and 
Motettenchor, the Gottingen Bach Fes- 
tival Orchestra, and the Choir of the 
Frankfurt State School of Music. (ARC 
3063) (Aug. 29) 

6:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

Air-conditioned events of the week 
before us all; you're invited. (Aug. 29) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY By members of 
the Young Americans for Freedom. 
(Aug. 29) 

7:15 COMMENTARY By members of 



the Students for a Democratic So- 
ciety. (Aug. 29) 

7:30 MIDDLE EAST PRESS REVIEW 

Reviews of the Arab and Israeli press, 
produced by the Broadcasting Foun- 
dation of America in cooperation with 
the Assoc, of Arab Broadcasters and 
Kol Israel. (Aug. 29) 

8:00 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 

Baird Searles and Neal Conan review 
weekly fantasy and science fiction, in 
literature, film, theatre and the per- 
forming ajts. (Aug. 29) 

8:15 MISCELLANY 

8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN 
CULTURAL REVOLUTION Julius 
Lester, author, singer, spokesman, in- 
terviewer, disk jockey, etc. plays music, 
and talks to people — maybe even 
you if you call him at OX 7-8506 
when the time is appropriate. 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 29) 

11:00 JAZZ, ETC. Recent recordings 
of the innovative jazzman Ornette 
Coleman, alto saxophonist, trumpeter, 
violinist, composer. (Aug. 29) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob 

does his famous Fred Astaire imita- 
tions. 



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FRIDAY, AUGUST 29 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNNG Larry dem- 
onstrates silverpoint technique. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug 28) 

9:15 COMMENTARY By the Y, A. F. 

(Aug. 28) 

9:30 BACH: The Cantatas Numbers 1 
and 4. For details, see August 28. 

10:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

From last night. 

10:45 OF UNICORNSAND UNIVERSES 

Science fiction and fantasy reviews. 
(Aug. 28) 

11:00 COMMENTARY By the S. D. S. 

(Aug. 28) 

11:15 MIDDLE EAST PRESS REVIEW 

From last night. 

11:45 GUILLAUME DE MACHAUT 

With the London Ambrosian Singers. 
Details, August 24. 

12:30 HEYWOOD HALE BROUN The 

writer and actor and sports commen- 
tator reads from his book A Studied 
Madnesss. (Doubleday) 



1 :00 Jazz, etc. Music and talk. Details, 
August 28. 

2:00 THE EVOLUTION OF THE 
CHURCH TODAY Leon-Josef Cardinal 
Suenens, Archbishop of Malines- Brus- 
sles, Belgium on the present situation 
and future of organized religion. From 
the Midway 1274. 

3:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND 
PROGRAM From August 27. 

4:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 

Marty Reeves reads Kevin Crossley- 
Holland's The Callow Pit Coffer, pub- 
lished by Seabury Press. 

5:00 BACH: The Cantatas From the 
DGG Archives series, the "Coffee Can- 
tata, Schweigt stille plaudert nicht," 
BWV 211, the "Peasant's Cantata, 
Mer hahn en neue Oberkeet," BWV 
212, and the Reformation Cantata. 
"Gott, der Herr, ist Sonn' und Schild." 
Kurt Thomas and Fritz Lehmann are 
the conductors. (ARC 3162, 3065) 

frtl5 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY If 

anything is happening in Washington 
this hot week. Bob Kuttner will let 
you know what it is. (Aug. 30) 



7:30 DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP Betty 

Pilkington with background informa- 
tion in the field of international rela- 
tions. (Aug. 30) 

8:00 A SATIRICAL VIEW A caustic 
look at things by Marshall Efron and 
crew. (Aug. 30) 

8:15 MISCELLANY 

8:30 OEDIPUS-OEDIPE An experimen- 
tal drama by John Reeves. The ma- 
terial comes from early and modern 
English and French writings, as well 
as Green Greek and Latin versions. 
(CBC) (Aug. 30) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL An 

hour left open for a program of im- 
mediate interest from the News and 
Public Affairs Dept. (Sept. 1) 

10:30 NEWS with Margot Adler. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY Bv Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 30) 

11:00 THE FREE MUSIC STORE An 

hour culled from many that were re- 
corded at the Saturday night festivals 
of last winter and spring. Recording 
engineers: John Edl and or Mike 
Ackeley. (Sept. 1) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE It should 
be cooler next month. 



Page 20 



WBAI 




8:00 GREAT PERFORMANCES OF 
THE CENTURY BUXTEHUDE Can- 
tatas: Wern ich, Herr Jesu; Jesu, 
Meine Freud'; Jubilate Domino SWEE- 
LINCK O lux beata trinitas; Echo 
fantasy; Ballo del granduca BUXTE- 
HUDE Was mich auf dieser Welt 
betrubt, Aperite mihi portas Perform- 
ance by Danish artists led by Finn 
Videro and Mogens Woldike SAINT- 
SAENS Concerto No. 2 in G Minor 
Artur de Greef, piano, New Symphony 
Orchestra of London / Sir Landon 
Ronald. 

9:30 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
A Saturday morning hour with Ronny 
Watkins. 

10:30 WAR SUMMARY By Paul Fischer. 
(Aug. 29) 

10:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW By Marshall 
Efron. (Aug. 29) 

11:00 CONVERSATION WITH SIMONE 
DE BEAUVOIR From WBAI's 1962 
Archives, an interview with her by 
Studs Terkel that took place in Paris 
in 1960. (AS #3) 

11:30 COUNTRY MUSIC Sweet smells 
and rural airs. (Aug. 24) 

12:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY 
From the Washington Bureau. (Aug. 



29) 
12:30 DIPLOMATIC CLOSE-UP By 

Betty Pilkington. (Aug. 29) 

1:00 OEDIPUS-OEDIPE An experimen- 
tal drama from the CBC. (Aug. 29) 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF JAZZ Presented 
by Jack McKinney. 

4:00 WITCH'S BLOOD Fredi Dundee 
reads the tenth chapter of the book 
by that title by William Blain, which 
tells the story of a witch and the 
town she cursed. 

4:30 THE HUNDRED THOUSAND 
SONGS OF MILAREPA A reading 
from the classic. From the 1962 Ar- 
chives. (AL 2537) 

5:30 A CONVERSATION WITH CHRIS- 
TOPHER ISHERWOOD Dick Elman 
and Bill Butler and the novelist in 
1962 (AL 2528) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS Sam 
Julty drives you up the wall. (Aug. 
31) 

7:15 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIOD- 
ICALS William Mandel, of the So- 
ciology Dept., Univ. of California in 
Berkeley, answers questions from lis- 
teners, and discusses some aspect of 
the Soviet Union. (KPFA) (Aug. 31) 

7:45 THE $24 REFUND Discussion of 
the little inconveniences and big dis- 
asters generated by just having to 



live in this wonderful city. (Aug. 31) 

8:00 THE ENDRES QUARTET A pro- 
gram of MOZART String Quartet in 
G Major; HAYDN String Quartet in 
D Major, Op. 2, No. 5; HINDEMITH 
6th String Quartet; and VON WEBER 
Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet 
in B Flat Major. Tapes courtesy of 
Association of German Broadcasters. 
(To be rebroadcast in September) 

9:15 MISCELLANY 

9:30 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
Trad, Bad, Mad Written especially for 
radio by the young English author, 
James Morgan, these are three inter- 
dependent plays that are highly so- 
phisticated versions of a fairy tale 
that of the Princess and the Frog. 
The cast includes: Charlotte Lane, 
Robert Bonnard, Ted Royce and Joseph 
Hamer. The play was dii-ected by Mary 
Schilling. Technical production and 
special effects by Richard Brause. The 
Mind's Eye Theatre is produced by 
Baird Searles. 

11:00 SCIENTISTS SPEAK OUT: This 
Time on Race Drs. Evelyn Mauss and 
Ruth Bennett and guests discuss the 
scientific aspects of race. (To be re- 
broadcast in September) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Steve Post reads 
from the ten commandments, and de- 
monstrates the "shalt-nots" with start- 
ling accuracy. 



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 31 



8:00 GREAT PERFORMANCES OF 
THE CENTURY: HINDEMITH KAM- 
MERMUSIKKREIS BEETHOVEN 
Serenade in D Major for string trio. 
Op. 8 MOZART Duo No. 2 in B-Flat 
Major for violin and viola, K 424 
HINDEMITH Trio No. 2 Szymon 
Goldberg, violin. Paul Hindemith, viola; 
Emanuel Fuermann, cello. SIBELIUS 
Tempest: Suite of Incidental Music; 
Prelude, Prospero; Miranda; Caliban's 
Song; Intrada (Berceuse); the Oak 
Tree; Humoreske The London Phil- 
harmonic Orch./Sir Thomas Beecham 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES The late Henry Cowell presents 
music from all over the world. From 
WBAI's Archives. 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES Operatic singers 
of the past, presented by the late 
Anthony Boucher. From the KPFA 
Archives. 

10:30 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS By 
Sam Julty. (Aug. 30) 

11:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIOD- 
ICALS Reviewed by William Mandel. 
(KPFA) (Aug. 30) 

11:30 GERMANY TODAY Presented by 
David Berger. Assoc, of German 
Brdcstrs. 

11:45 THE $24 REFUND Discussion of 
problems of living in Fun City. (Aug. 
30) 

12:00 THE LONG RUSSIAN WINTER 



#7: Boris Godounov, composed in 
1872 by Modest Mussorgsky. This is, 
perhaps, the most well-known, and 
widely performed Russian opera out- 
side the Soviet Union. It is also, very 
likely, the greatest. 
Produced for WBAI by Kathy Dobkin. 

3:45 MISCELLANY 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY Fass trips on 
a light beam, and falls on his face. 

5:00 THE STUDENTS OF LEIPZIG 
Works by KRIEGER, ROSEMMUL- 
LER, and PEZEL performed by mem- 
bers of the Little Orchestra of London 
with Sally Le Sage, Christina Clarke, 
Nigel Rogers, and Geoffrey Shaw; 
conducted by Joshua Rifkin. (To be 
rebroadcast in September) 

5:30 COUNTRY MUSIC Music to pick 
tomatoes by. (Sept. 6) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 READINGS FROM THE CON- 
GRESSIONAL RECORD As Lermon- 
tov once said, "It would all be so funny 
if it weren't so sad" (only he said 
it in Russian . . . actually, he only 
wrote it, we say it). (Sept. 1) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BLTRN A rebroadcast of a recent 
book review. (Sept. 1) 

7:15 COMMENTARY By Neil Fabricant, 
legislative director of the New York 
Civil Liberties Union. (Sept. 1) 

7:30 AFRICA SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 
By Artur Vilankulu. (Sept. 1) 

8:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE WBAI's 



news program in the arts, consisting 
of reviews and discussions of events 
in the various fields. Personnel varies, 
but likely this week are: Deborah 
Jowitt for dance, Murray Ralph for 
music, Milton Hoffman for television, 
and Tom McKnight for art and ar- 
chitecture. Baird Searles does his best 
to moderate. (Sept. 1) 

8:45 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
Titus Groan Dramatic readings from 
the Gormerighast trilogy of Mervin 
Peake. The cast includes: Albert 
Norton, Rose Mary Anderson, Julie 
Scherer, Kathleen Dalton, John Wilson 
and Larry Holpp. Technical direction 
is by David Rapkin; the director and 
adapter is Baird Searles. 

10:00 ELECTRONIC MUSIC From a 
new release: WILLIAM HELLER- 
MAN, Ariel; PRIL SMILEY, Eclipse; 
OLLY WILSON, Cotus; EUGENIUSZ 
HUDNIK, Dixi; BOHDAN MAZU- 
REK, Bozzetti; JOZEK MALOVEC, 
Orthogenesis. (Vol. 4 of Turnabout's 
electronic music series, TV 34301) 
(To be rebroadcast in September) 

11:00 NEW AMERICAN REVIEW 
Readings or discussions involving ma- 
terial from the magazine of that name. 
Produced jointly by WBAI and the 
New American Library. (Sept. 1) 

11:30 THE IMPRESARIO The opera by 
W. A. MOZART. (To be rebroadcast 
in September) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Steve Post tells 
you what your thing should be, and 
how to do it. 



WBAI 



Page 21 



Tonight, Vacation In 
Romantic Yarbrough 



GLENN YARBROUGH 

Somehovy^ Someway 




GlennYarbrough.flie Voice of Our Time. 

Both Hopefui and Loving. 

His New Album: $498. Double Occupancy 



on 



yj Warner Bros.- T^Arts Records & Tapes 



Page 22 WBAI 

A PURELY PERSONAL SUMMARY OF THE MANAGEMENT GOALS OF WBAI 

By FRANK A. MILLSPAUGH, JR., General Manager 



Within a period of months after I became General Manager 
of WBAI in April, 1966. I evolved a set of immediate goals for 
the station, the attainment of which seemed neccessary to the 
continued existence and strengthening of listener-supported radio 
in New York. In setting forth these goals, I do not pretend that they 
were born full-grown and coherently related; this is, after all, 
a statement after the fact. This does not, however, reduce 
their validity. 

These goals are expiessed at this time and in this form in order 

( 1 ) to provide our supporters and friends with an understanding 
of the developments within WBAI over the past three years; and 

(2) to establish a context within which some of the criticisms of 
the station may be evaluated and judged. 

STRUCTURAL GOALS: The following efforts have been 
undertaken in order to restructure the system of authority/ res- 
ponsibility which previously prevailed. 

1. Deccntializalion of Decision-Making: Previous to my tenure 
the organizational st.-uctiire of WBAI was one of management 
autocracy subordinate only to a central, national board of 
directors. In the last three years, we have dfcentralized the 
national board of directors to give the local boards effective, 
although delegated, policy control. We have replaced the original 
authority of the manager with a three-person management team, 
which in turn has distributed authority to the various departments 
comprising the station. As examples, program schedules are now 
created in meeting of program personnel in which all interested 
station personnel may participate; budgets are similarly developed. 
These were once entirely one-man concerns. Further, regular staff 
meetings are held to review operations. Similarly, the local board 
meets at least monthly to assess station problems and progress. 

2. Broadening of Support Base: Three years ago, WBAI 
had 8,000 subscribers and a budget of about $250,000 per year. 
The deficit was met by a small group of generous and concerned 
philanthropists. Although none of these individuals ever, to my 
knowledge, attempted to control the station through their support, 
that danger was certainly present. Further, there was an informal 
influence through the inclination of station personnel to try — 
subconsciously — to anticipate the possible response of one or 
another large donor to a given program or issue. 

At present, WBAI has 22,000 subscribers and an operating 
budget of $450,000. We have nearly tripled the numbers of 
people supporting the station and less than doubled the budget. 
This has the direct effect of minimizing the influence of any 
individual large donor or group of them and of increasing the 
independence of the station from undue economic pressures. 

3. Diversification of Constituency: Three years ago. WBAI 
had a comfortably homogeneous listener-support constituency: 
middle-aged, college educated, upper middle-class, left-liberal, 
white. While we have attempted to continue meeting the needs of 
this audience, we have also tried to serve others whose needs are 
not met by the major media: the young, the non-white, the un- 
established, the activist. We believe that the station must serve 
such needs if it is to be a vital force in our community. 

PROGRAMMING GOALS: These are not original with us. 
but are in fact suggested by Pacifica Radio's original charter. We 
have simply been more deliberate and self-conscious in pursuing 
them than have previous administrations. This is because we are 
conscious of broadcasting in its role as instrument of social 
change as well as the more traditional conception as passive mirror 
for society. 

1. Bridging the Generation Gap: Although many radio stations 
direct their appeal to young people, this appeal is predicated 
principally upon goals of exploitation: they are a market for pimple 
ointment. WBAI has attempted to provide young people with the 
opportunity to honestly and openly confront the society they are 
inheriting and to challenge the people who are debasing their 
inheritance. Genuinely concerned people on the other side of the 
gap have their first opportunity to hear these views directly, not 
filtered through the bias of self-appointed academic interpreters. 
These open expressions of young people frequently shock some 
of our older listeners, but no more so than the older values 
have shocked our younger generations. 

2. Providing for Interracial Dialogue: What I have said of the 



young is doubly true of the non-white. For years, there has 
been a monologue: whites talking to — or at — blacks. WBAI 
has attempted to provide an agency through which the 
dialogue can be completed with non-white response. Only in this 
way can a dialogue be created. However, many whites have not 
particularly cared to hear what some blacks have Co say. For 
them, it is a lost opportunity; for the rest of us, it is increasingly 
valuable. Of course, harsh words are sometimes spoken. Unfor- 
tunately, reconciliation frequently requires a prior period of 
confrontation. 

3. Communication to tlie Outside World: Many individuals 
and organizations attempt to preserve peace of mind and 
personal purity by talking only to themselves. This practice 
provides for two pleasureable effects: it reduces quarrelling and 
reassures one of his own rectitude. Unfortunately, it also limits 
the dissemination of valuable ideas and ensures one's social 
irrelevancy. WBAI is interested in persons who are concerned for 
public edification and who express themselves accordingly. WBAI 
is not anti-intellectual, but it certainly is anti-intellectual-elitism. 

FINANCIAL GOALS: There is in our society a number of 
well-meaning people who still seem to believe that poverty is good 
for the soul. We at WBAI do not share this tenet. It is our 
experience that poverty is brutalizing — both on the individual 
and organizational levels. We think that what WBAI is doing is 
important, and we find that we do this work better when we 
have the money to do it. Money helps us to do the following: 

1. To Increase and Retain Staff: Although WBAI will always 
depend partially on volunteer program producers, even these need 
staff support. Further, staff producers are necessary to provide 
the skeleton or basic framework of the programming. They are 
also needed to exercise program judgment on volunteer offerings. 
WBAI is opposed to censorship of ideas and manner of expres- 
sion. However, there is an obvious requirement for judgment in 
selection. There is, after all, only a certain number of broadcast 
hours available in a day, just as there are only so many pages in a 
newspaper. ( In fact, it is easier to increase the number of pages 
than it is to increase the number of hours). Selectivity must be 
practiced on the criteria of relevancy and articulateness. These are 
professional judgemenls and require a professional staff. And good 
staff must be paid a living wage. 

2. To Improve Physical Facility: WBAI's physical plant was 
inadequate. It was too small and it was an inappropriate structure. 
We are trying to remedy that now. Over the last two years, we 
have substantially upgraded our electronic equipment. We now 
occupy a new building: the Robert Goodman Public Broadcast- 
ing Center. Frankly, it has taken longer than any of us desired 
and it is costing more than any of us anticipated, but it remains 
essential, and now we are close to achieving this goal. 

3. To Improve Programming: In effect, that is what this entire 
statement is about, for programming is the heart and raison d'etre 
for WBAI. More specifically, programming needs have the 
consistent first priority on all income to the station. Whenever 
there are conflicting claims, the decision goes to programming. 
And no one is less satisfied than we are. We want to do much 
more than we are presently doing and can presently do. We are 
proud of our programming, and because of our pride, we wish 
to program more and program better. It takes creativity; it takes 
ingenuity; it takes integrity: it takes dedication; it takes money. 
We lack money. 

CONCLUSION: If the nine goals discussed above are not 
all-encompassing, they are certainly necessary first steps. If they 
seem self evident to the point of banality, bear in mind that their 
implementation has required discipline, sacrifice, occasional per- 
sonnel changes, and frequent acrimony and resen'ment. Further, 
it is worth observing that the WBAI "experiment" based on these 
goals over the last three years has been sufficiently encouraging 
to have resulted in their adoption by both the other Pacifica 
stations. KPFK in Los Angeles and KPFA-B in Berkeley/ San 
Francisco. It is our intent neither to be a farm-club for the big 
leagues — the commercial networks — nor a sand-lot game 
for incompetents. It is our intent to build a new, major league — 
a national, as well as local, alternative to the caution and social 
irresponsibility of the commercial media. 



WBAI 



Page 23 



FOLIO CLASSIFIED 

No aavertisement in this Folio is to be 
construed as an endorsement of any 
organization or business by WBAI ... or 
viceversa. All Folio ads are addressed to 
all persons ... no discriminatory ads, 
please. 

RATE PER INSERTION: $1 per line (ap- 
proximately 40 characters per line) paid 
in advance. Words to appear in bold face 
should be underlined. 

DEADLINE: The first of the preceding 
month. All Folio advertisements should 
be submitted in writing. Send with check 
or money order for the full amount to: 
Folio Advertising, WBAI, 30 East 39th 
Street, New York 10016. 



SERVICE for your Hi-Fi equipment. Stereo/ 
Mono. TV also. Nat Weintraub. IN 1-7459, 

LOST — Onfi Grail. Last seen at supper 
party. Sentimental value only; material 
gilt and paste. Please return, Arthuris Rex 
c/o Camelot. No questions asked. 



MATHEMATICS — Does the teacher get 
through to your child? I do! Arithmetic, 
algebra, geometry, physics, trigonometry. 
Grad. Record Exam, etc. Experienced 
tutor. Call 787-0238. 

TRIP TO HAZARD, KY. forming for Spring 
'70. See the union hall and sheriff's office. 
Watch for further details. E. W. 

LOST — A lovely hankey. Venetian lace. 
White. Return to Desdemona, c/o Cyprus, 
Moorish Section. 

GREENFEEL is a magazine of love — can 
you believe it. A community of people 
trying to live feeling, fulfilled, unlonely 
lives. (Let us touch you). Greenfeel, (WB), 
Box 347, Barre, Vermont 05641 ... $1. 

LOST — One lump. Will do no one any 
good but the owners. No questions 
asked. Return to R. Maidens, Rhinebot- 
tom, Germany. 

ART CLASSES 

ART SUPPLIES, FRAMING, PAINTINGS 
San Art Studio/brochure MA 2-8025 
15 7th Avenue off Flatbush Avenue. 
B'klyn 11217. 



GUITAR LESSONS 
ADVANCED Folk Picking 
THEORY, Blues, improvisation: ideas 
Beginners welcome — Call and discuss 
fees & time — both are flexible. 
Call Alan 824-0727 

HANSEL AND GRETEL: Please return 
home. Daddy loves you. Step Mommy 
loves you. All will be forgiven. Let's talk 
it out. Contact either of your Uncles 
Grimm. They will convey messages. 
Remember, we love you. 

HELP! We're moving to Bloomfield — 
Brookside School area — • is anyone out 
there? (201) 759-7572. 

Return to: 



LOST: One 

Peter Abelard, U of P. 



PERSONAL OUT-OF-PRINT BOOK-SEARCH 

Hard-to-find books. Worldwide search. Free 

prompt quotes. Write FRANCES KLENETT, 

13 Cranberry St., B'klyn. 11201. 

ULster 2-2424. 

CUSTOM-MADE PLEXIGLASS 
CUBES & FURNITURE 

cubus company (212) 592-6886 



SONY - WBAI gets the Profit 




SONYTV-710U $99.95 

LIGHTWEIGHT TELEVISION FOR EASY PORTABILITY 

FRONT MOUNTED SPEAKER 

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WEIGHT: 8 LBS. 6 OZ. 

PICTURE TUBE: 7" PICTURE MEASURED DIAGONALLY 



WBAI 

359 East 62nd Street 

New York, New York 10021 



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Please send me Sony(s) #_ 
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